102 votes
Accepted

What fueled the street lights in 13th-century Cordoba?

I have traced back this claim to its original source. Come along with me on this journey! Let's start with a source which used to be linked on Wikipedia and is commonly cited online: For ten miles in ...
Avery's user avatar
  • 2,429
58 votes
Accepted

Why does the King of Spain still claim defunct titles like the King of Hungary?

They're maintained as a matter of tradition, which is not unusual in monarchies. It's used both for prestige and as a relic of an era when European diplomacy revolved around territorial claims of the ...
Semaphore's user avatar
  • 97.6k
55 votes

Why was Spanish Fascist dictatorship left in power after World War II?

WW II was primarily a power struggle, and to a lesser degree an ideological struggle. This means that your assumption about the motivations of WW II are incorrect. If it had been an ideological ...
KorvinStarmast's user avatar
40 votes
Accepted

Why was the Spanish kingdom in America called New Spain if Spain didn't exist as a country back then?

‘Spain’ in the sense of ‘Hispania’, alluding to the Roman province, certainly existed as a concept at the time, even if the Kingdom didn’t (yet). Indeed, there’s several medieval Kings in the Iberian ...
user22453's user avatar
  • 1,353
37 votes
Accepted

Why does a Star of David appear at a rally with Francisco Franco?

Q Why does a Star of David appear at a rally with Francisco Franco? Because the symbol was much more ambiguous at the time, and not a one-to-one signifier of "Jewishness". Because Franco ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
33 votes
Accepted

Why was Spanish Fascist dictatorship left in power after World War II?

The OP said this in a comment: technically speaking, Spain was a satellite state. However, the treaty was mainly intended for the countries within the big blocks so I assume it was just ignored. The ...
Schwern's user avatar
  • 55.2k
31 votes
Accepted

Why isn't there a single trace of Germanic influence in Iberian Languages?

(Note that there are definitively many traces of Germanic influence on Spanish/Portuguese. For example, as @AlbertYago's pointed out, the Iberian vocabulary contains several Germanic imports; ...
Semaphore's user avatar
  • 97.6k
28 votes
Accepted

Why are Spanish cultures labeled as 'Latin' today, but Italian and eastern Europe cultures aren't?

This is a simple case of meaning that was lost in translation. Latin America translates as "América Latina" in both Portuguese and Spanish. It's the region of the American continent where ...
Luiz's user avatar
  • 4,448
27 votes
Accepted

Did the Allies try to "bribe" Franco to join them in World War II?

Stanley G Payne's Franco and Hitler: Spain, Germany and World War II is a good study of Spain's relationships with Germany, and secondarily with the UK and USA, during the war. The Allies never tried ...
John Dallman's user avatar
  • 31.6k
25 votes
Accepted

What kind of knife could this be?

Got it, is a Spanish M1969 Bayonet, check it here: https://www.preferredarms.com/weapons/daggers.php
Alberto Yagos's user avatar
23 votes

How has Catalonia ended up being so nationalist?

Short answer: The latest flareup is the most recent of many that have taken place over the centuries. More details are found in this wiki article on Catalonia. But basically, Catalonia was always the ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 105k
22 votes

Why does a Star of David appear at a rally with Francisco Franco?

Although we can't tell the colours from the OP's photo, and although the dimensions are different, circumstantial evidence suggests this may be the flag of the Khalif of Morocco, the puppet ruler who ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
18 votes
Accepted

How long did it take to get news of the sighting of the Spanish Armada from Land’s End to London?

It seems to me that there are a number of variables to this, many of which would vary from beacon to beacon, so getting an 'accurate' transmission time for the information is going to be almost ...
KillingTime's user avatar
  • 4,801
17 votes
Accepted

Did any Moors accompany Hernando de Soto in his exploration of Mississippi?

I understand that there are four surviving accounts of de Soto's expedition. Three of those accounts were written by survivors: Rodrigo Rangel or Ranjel, who was de Soto’s personal secretary; Luys ...
sempaiscuba's user avatar
  • 77.5k
16 votes

Why does the King of Spain still claim defunct titles like the King of Hungary?

It's actually not that unusual for monarchs to claim titles in pretence as a means of increasing their prestige. The Kings of England and Great Britain had famously claimed to also be Kings/Queens of ...
sempaiscuba's user avatar
  • 77.5k
15 votes

Did the Allies try to "bribe" Franco to join them in World War II?

Short Answer Not only is there no evidence that the Allies tried to 'bribe' Spain to declare war on the Axis, there is strong evidence that the Allies knew any such attempt would be futile for several ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
14 votes

How has Catalonia ended up being so nationalist?

a response from a mostly neutral, catalan born citizen. TL;DR: Catalonia isn't suffering a rise of nationalism, but of neo-autonomism / pro-independence, mainly due to loss of civil rights, economic ...
CptEric's user avatar
  • 1,479
14 votes

Why did Charlemagne retreat after the Battle of Pamplona?

The short answer is that Charlemagne didn’t have much choice. Roger Collins, in ‘Early Medieval Europe 300 – 1000' asserts that The expedition that Charles led into the Ebro valley in 778 was ill-...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
14 votes
Accepted

Do medieval historic references to "Semites" refer to Jews or to speakers of Semitic in general?

There are no medieval historic references to "Semites". The word did not exist until the late 18th Century. It was coined by Historian August Ludwig von Schlözer to have a useful word to describe that ...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
  • 119k
13 votes
Accepted

Did Franco ever refer to his regime as Fascist?

No. Franco was a Falangist, and called himself that. (In real life more of a military opportunist, who grabbed his chance.) Fascists were the followers of Mussolini. Hitler was a National-Socialist. ...
Jos's user avatar
  • 22k
12 votes
Accepted

Could the nukes involved in the 1966 Palomares B-52 crash have detonated?

It seems unlikely that the 1966 incident could have resulted in the nuclear explosion of one or more of the four hydrogen bombs that fell at Palomares, and I am not aware of any serious claims to the ...
sempaiscuba's user avatar
  • 77.5k
12 votes
Accepted

What is the approximate value of a Spanish ducat in 1557?

Lifting the contents of the very helpful link provided by @gvk into an answer: Source: Fiat Money in 17th Century Castile, by François R. Velde, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and Warren E. Weber, ...
DevSolar's user avatar
  • 13.9k
12 votes
Accepted

What was the expected retirement age for men in Spain in 1936?

In the Ley del Retiro Obrero from 1919, the age for retirement of workers was established at 65 years. The Law was applied from 1923 on, but it was criticized by the patrons and the high corruption ...
Carlos Martin's user avatar
12 votes

Why are Spanish cultures labeled as 'Latin' today, but Italian and eastern Europe cultures aren't?

Why are Spanish cultures labeled as 'Latin' today, but Italian and eastern Europe cultures aren't? All Spanish cultures are labeled as latin, but not "latino". The difference in these two ...
James's user avatar
  • 2,655
11 votes

What is the basis of the Spanish claim to Gibraltar?

1) what is the basis for the Spanish state’s actions? Any damn basis they please. They’re a Westphalian state. Being a sovereign entity involves never having to say you’re sorry unless another entity ...
Samuel Russell's user avatar
11 votes

Did Franco ever refer to his regime as Fascist?

The evidence from Franco's own statements strongly suggests that he did not, at least in public. In fact, from 1937, he specifically rejected the term for the Falangists, though he did concede that ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

In the Spanish-American War (1898), who formally declared war first?

Spain formally declared war first on April 23 1898. Documentos presentados á las Cortes en la legislatura de 1898 (Google Books): El estado de guerra existente entre España y los Estados Unidos ...
user103496's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

In Francoist Spain, what steps were required for non-Catholics to marry?

what was required for non-Catholics to marry in Francoist Spain? Imagine, for example, that two Protestants want to marry in Spain in 1950 Short answer for 1950: they needed an affidavit expressing ...
Ginasius's user avatar
  • 1,914
10 votes

Did any Moors accompany Hernando de Soto in his exploration of Mississippi?

The entire image in question can be seen here. Under the image is a numbered scene describing the images individuals. The person in question is listed as Moorish Servant. A little more research into ...
justCal's user avatar
  • 39.7k

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