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It seems based on the text from Helen Vella Bonavita book Key to Christendom and George Cassar, a professor in Malta, book Defending a Mediterranean island that the Spanish were not necessarily intending to retake the island, but hoping to defend it. Context The Knights Hospitaller at the time existed on Malta only because of a land grant by the Spanish ...


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Short Answer: After 1520 the lands in the Americas were certainly under the Castilian crown. Long Answer: As far as I know the lands in the new world were all under the crown of Castile and had no connection with the crown of Aragon., except that Ferdinand and Isabella mayhave Jointly ruled them from 1492 to 1504, and when Queen isabella of Castile, etc. ...


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He (they) tried somehow, but it didn't work due of a handful of unfortunate deaths. Ferdinand and Isabella didn't try to invade Portugal - and other answers explain quite well why it would have been a bad idea - but they arranged the marriages that could have lead to the unification of Castille, Aragon and Portugal by marriage. Isabella of Aragon, the ...


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complementing the above answers: The different kingdoms were a personal union, not an unified country. e.g., the Invincible Armada was financed by Castille, as the cortes of Aragon did not support the king's war. So, waging an offensive war required raising support separately on his various domains (expensive and time-consuming), OR, having only some ...


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The loss in the first third of the 19th century of the American territories (Spain did not really have "colonies" in the way the British Empire had, the American territories were integral part of Spain) did not have any significant impact on Spain`s public discourse, because the American territories had never really had. However, with the development of ...


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