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Were the islands/countries discovered by Hispanic explorers named after Mozarabic feast days? The short answer is no. But that no has to be clarified. It could be yes or no, according to which Rite the person who named the said lands belonged to. Both Rites were in use in Spain at the time of the Spanish colonization of the Americas. The name "Mozarabic ...


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First, the Mozarabic Rite was also Catholic, the correct terms would be Mozarabic versus Roman Rites. I have heard a Mozarabic Mass (and I keep the printed missal), and (personal opinion) I did not consider it sufficiently different (it was developed with strong influences from Roman traditions anyway) to justify keeping it alive with a separated calendar ...


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You don't specify which discoveries are of interest, but the specific days on which islands were encountered is definitely recorded in ships' log books. For example, a log survives of Magellan and Elcano's voyage and was published on Cambridge University Press as "A Log-Book of Magellan's Voyage, 1519–1522". Cross-referencing it with feast calendars would ...


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According to the book Bandido: The Life and Times of Tiburcio Vasquez By John Boessenecker (2012, p. 4), Anza started recruiting in Culiacán on March 28, 1775. I have the impression that he was only there for a few days at most. This page from the US National Park Service also mentions that Anza was at Culiacán in March, but then says: He continued ...


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