New answers tagged

-1

Welcome to History.stackexchange Your question is interesting, and a lot of points were highlighted by other contributors. I would like to add some points: We are in a World War, not only in the fight of Axis/Germany versus Switzerland. One of the contributor spoke in the conditions of an uchrony where the Axis is victorious. What could be interesting is ...


4

Impossibility of an invasion My answer is based on wikipedia article Operation Tannenbaum, which is about German plans for war against Switzerland during WW2: Germany started planning the invasion of Switzerland on 25 June 1940, the day that France surrendered. At this point, the German army in France consisted of three groups with two million soldiers ...


2

There was a documentary last year if I remember well on French/German tv Arte which covered the subject, and its point of view was that despite what Swiss people like to think, they were not the hedgehog in German feet, but more likely the bankers of the third reich, so it had nothing to do with military. It was explained that in this time, no country in ...


2

Question: I'm simply asking if the defense of Switzerland during WW2 was overrated. Many people claim that the country was impossible to occupy, I just want to know if this is not clearly exaggerated. It is a myth that Switzerland is impossible to invade or occupy. Hitler in 1940 described Switzerland as a "pimple on the face of Europe", as he developed ...


2

Here's the answer to a silghtly different, but highly relevant question: Why didn't Germany attack Switzerland? There's a multitude of reasons, in no particular order (all links in German): Luck (source 1) Military deterrent (source 1) Lack of a good logistic opportunity for the Axis (source 1) Willing partner in trade (source 1) North south ...


0

No, Switzerland was not self sufficient food wise. While the mountainous terrain is an advantage militarily, it is a big problem when you can't trade with your neighbors. occupying the country would be relatively easy for the same reasons, hunger humbles even the most determined. I would bet a three month blockade, and air campaign (on critical ...


-1

Totally new to this site, and not an historian. But... no other answer is considering weapons. AFAIK Switzerland doesn't/didn't make its own weapons. Once the war is started, anything spent or destroyed by the enemy won't be replaced. Switzerland is neutral, so it has no allies to provide them with weapons/ammunition, and even if they are/were rich enough to ...


0

Probably not impossible, as any country can invade another, but if you mean conquer it'd be quite hard, as the Alps would hinder German movement, and there wasn't any real motivation to invade Switzerland, as Switzerland is a mainly German country that focused on neutrality and didn't have any good resources the German war machine needed like oil. The only ...


20

The Germans were certain they could. For instance, their 1940 plans for Operation Tannenbaum estimated that a force of 300,000 to 500,000 men would have been sufficient. Swiss military leadership also thought that an invasion would have been successful: Their revised military plan for the event of an invasion, the Réduit national, called for a delaying ...


1

Not impossible, but costly and difficult, to the point of being a net-negative. I've been to Switzerland and more in other parts of the Alps (Austria and Germany). I'm also interested in history and military strategy. Based on what I've read over the years: Invading Switzerland is a hard problem due to geography. There is a limited number of roads open all ...


1

The Reich annexed or invaded various other Germanic territories, such as Austria (before the war even began), as well as Denmark, Norway, Belgium, Netherland, and Luxembourg (after it started). More to the point, the Low Countries, as Switzerland, also adopted, initially, a position of neutrality, so your question is certainly reasonable. I believe one of ...


38

Ok, since I think I finally got your real question (as I see it): I'm simply asking if the defense of Switzerland during WW2 was overrated. Many people claim that the country was impossible to occupy, I just want to know if this is not clearly exaggerated. The emphasis is what I interpret as your "real" question (since there is a lot of confusion here) ...


5

Shields up!!! It was advantageous for the Germans not to conquer Switzerland, and this would be a major factor in deciding the merit of doing so. A few only examples: Switzerland provided the Nazis access to bank accounts and "safe" deposits of Jews and others. Exactly how these were divied up is unknown to me, but one can safely assume that the Nazis did ...


54

No country is impossible to invade. Andorra could invade the USA. The question you should have asked was "Was Switzerland Impossible to Conquer during World War II?". The answer is no country is impossible to conquer. But there is great variation in the probability that a specific country will actually conquer another specific country if it tries to ...


8

This is an hypothetical question. I'll try to answer based only on the military concept. You have already answered your own question, in part 4. You don't need to conquer the whole country; only the main cities and the fields are desirable. Forget about the mountains; you don't need them. Once in a while they'll have to attack some places to prevent ...


10

There were many practical reasons why Switzerland was not occupied of which none of the first answer of @AmorphouBob apply Some of these reasons are: militarily Switzerland was considered a 'thorny' problem, as expressed in the question and the Swiss strategy there was no strategic advantage (Switzerland was surrounded by the Axis powers) an economic ...


25

What factors were Hitler's / Germany's motivations for WW2? Revanchism, stealing raw materials, and racial hatreds. The Swiss are largely German-speaking / Germanic, so there's no "racial superiority" factor to promote invasion and de facto depopulation/extermination and colonization. They don't have a excessive amount of arable land for "true German" ...


8

I have come to the conclusion that this bullet originated from an M61 Vulcan cannon. Developed shortly after WW2, and in common use over the last few decades in Switzerland. Even today the Swiss Airforce fly the F/A-18 with the M61 Vulcan cannon mounted. It is hard to place a timestamp on when the bullet was fired, given the many years of use. Based on the ...


4

This is not a definitive answer, because I haven't found a firm source to establish when the height standard came into existence, and because the history of army height requirements is turning out to be surprisingly difficult to google. With this in mind, I'd stick my neck out and suggest that no, the standard if any was probably different when the regiment ...


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