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40

Cavalry sabres (a.k.a. Shashkas) were still widely used in the Russian Civil War (1918-1922) and appear in many books on that period. This weapon is primarily associated with Cossacks even though it was standard equipment in the Russian and later Soviet army. The Russian Wikipedia article claims that Shashkas were still used by the cavalry in the Second ...


28

A tuareg takooba sword, maybe Scabbard and half-moon markings on the blade are reasonably similar to a tuareg takooba sword shown on antiqueswordsonline. See images below: note that the half-moon markings appear at the same place as on the sword above, where the two outer fullers (grooves) end. From a general description: "The typical blade tapers, ...


24

Anywhere between "after first serious use" and "never". Assuming thorough, regular maintenance, a sword can last almost indefinitely - the oldest one I've held that has seen use was about 250 years old and might still be usable, given a good cleaning. The oldest one that I've seen was about 1500 years old and while thoroughy rusty, was worn (indicating ...


21

I believe that the last use of sword in Western military were cavalry sabres used in cavalry charges alongside revolvers. Those were used in the Crimean war and in the USA Civil War. So we are talking mid-19th century. After the USA Civil War automatic rifles made cavalry obsolete (or nearly so) so I do not think you will find any more examples. ...


18

The shield came first. The sword is an invention of the bronze age, but the shield has been used to protect against many types of weapons by stone age (not primitive) peoples. It is still in use today by traditional societies. For example: See pics of an Australian aborigine and a Zulu warrior. The shield is believe to have been invented in the late ...


18

As it is, all three are interesting for being completely different methods of achieving a high quality of steel. Equally interesting is that they are each of high quality in different ways. As for Tamahagane, the iron that was available in Japan was actually very poor compared to that found in Europe. It had a characteristically low carbon content, and the ...


17

Toledo steel was a very good steel, comparable to mainstream contemporary ones. It is based mostly on the content of the material and way of hardening. Now the best European steel for blades is not Spanish, but Swedish V10. With Damascus there is a wide-spread fallacy. What is now called "true damascus" - blades based on the way of smithing of two or more ...


16

That looks like a Chinese double sword Similar examples Chinese Shuangjian Double Sword A Fine Chinese Double Sword Set, Shuang Jian Note. In many countries, mislaid belongings still legally belong to the original owner (or their heirs), not to the building/land owner and not to the finder.


14

Wikipedia's page on Japanese swordsmithing provides some information on the time frames involved in the manufacture of good quality blades: The forging of a Japanese blade typically took many days or weeks, and was considered a sacred art, traditionally accompanied by a large panoply of Shinto religious rituals. As with many complex endeavors, rather than ...


14

This is very likely another fascine knife (compare pictures on Faschinenmesser): The fascine knife was a side arm / tool issued to 17th to 19th century light infantry and artillery. It served both as a personal weapon and as a tool for cutting fascines (bundles of sticks used to strengthen the sides of trenches or earth ramparts protecting the batteries). ...


13

I have friends that forge knives and swords. Assuming you already have your steel stock, a couple days will be sufficient. Maybe less than one day if you work hard at it. This will vary by smith and by sword type. An apprentice might take a week or more.


13

The Romans developed tactics that involved both swords and spears. The spears ("pilum") were used first, and were throwing spears (not "polearms"). After the "shock and awe" administered by the throwing spears, Roman soldiers would close in with short, thrusting swords to finish the job. These tactics were similar to those used by men armed with (one shot) ...


12

TL;DR: We don't know, but at least ~170 swords bearing - in whole or in part - some variation of "VLFBERHT" are known to exist. Number of Extant VLFBERHT swords: I came across the closest available approximation to an answer we're likely to get: The finds The number of extant sword blades with the signature Vlfberht is not known... Probably the ...


12

Pole arms vary greatly in length and purpose. Everything from a Zulu iklwa, a short 1 to 2 meter personal thrusting weapon... Source: Therion Arms International ...to the 7 meter pike favored by everyone from Philip of Macedonia to Charles the XII of Sweden. Source Swords also vary greatly from the Roman gladius, a short thrusting weapon meant to be used ...


11

Since British soldier Jack Churchill was still using a sword in WW2 (and getting the latest yet confirmed kill with a bow, also in WW2), this might just be the most recent major war where these were used.


11

The cavalry tactics could differ from century to century, yet when they got firearms, for sure, they had to learn quick swapping from firearm to a saber during the attack. The Russian cavalry officer Nadezhda Durova (aka The Cavalry Maiden), who fought in Napoleonic wars, mentioned some details in her well-known memoirs. That is how she depicted the ...


10

The only reliable use of a sword I can find is mentioned in Tuchman's book 'The Guns of August' when a British cavalry Captain used the 1912 new pattern sabre against some German cavalry. That was August 1914.I will dig out the reference. [edit] Page 269 in my edition in the Chapter 'Debacle: Lorraine,Ardennes,Charleroi,Mons'. "Captain Hornby, leader of ...


9

The Stele of the Vultures shows Sumerian spearmen employing shields - it's from the middle of the third millennium BCE. While long bronze daggers are found in parts of Anatolia about this time, true bronze swords longer than 60cm and strong enough to be used for weapon-to-weapon combat, would take another thousand years to become prevalent as metalworking ...


9

In medieval Europe it took a standard blacksmith about a week to make a decent average steel longsword. If they where making something for their lord or king they would often spend as much as 6 months ensuring they had the ornate design perfect, but that's about it. Usually a sword would take about 1-2 months to finish, not because they where spending that ...


9

The language is Chinese. Here's a clearer image (taken from http://iantiqueonline.ning.com/group/whadjafind/forum/topics/japanese-kanji-katana-samurai-sword-i-d-help?) The text is verbatim: 張武傑 (seal of a person called 張武傑). Maybe this is supposed to suggest that 張武傑, which sounds like a Chinese person's name, was involved in the manufacturing. 联合刀具 ...


8

Taking into account that the first "R" and the second are graphically very different (the first "R" could actually be "N"), I propose another possible version: (in) NOMINE DOMINI CHRISTI OMNIPOTENTIS – CHRISTUS CUSTODIAT HONOREM WILLELMI,DOMINO NOSTRO GRATIAS HABENTIS – DOMINUS CHRISTUS, OMNIPOTENS REDEMPTOR, VINCIT (et) IMPERAT + In order to try to ...


7

What you have there appears to be a Moro Kris, or Kalis. It is a type of short sword or long dagger that used to be common in the Muslim (aka: Moro) parts of the southern Philippines. In the southern Philippines, the kris provided the Muslim armies with their counterpart to the Spanish weaponry. During the Philippine–American War, the death of ...


7

First, it's probably a sword made in Toledo, Spain. This city is famous for its ancient sword industry. Today, the sword industry in Toledo forges both high-quality swords and souvenirs of industrial quality (not only recreations from Spanish history; they make Japanese katanas, swords from movies such as The Lord of the Rings and Conan movies, etc.) And ...


7

One technique used to hold the assembly together is called 'peening'. The tang actually penetrates through the end of the pommel, and then is hammered and polished flush. The (commercial) website Albion Swords has some excellent diagrams displaying this and other methods. A google image search on 'sword peening pommel' will also give you some sample images ...


7

It appears to be a Spanish machete of the mid 19th century. They were issued to pioneer units (Gastadores) in the army. http://www.agmohio.com/items/12031101.htm As the article suggests they were still being used at the end of the century during the Spanish American war, the result of which saw America gain Spanish territories like the Philippines, Guam, ...


6

Cutlasses remained a personal weapon in various navies, mainly for use when boarding an enemy vessel, I think. The cutlass was reported to have been used during the Korean War (wiki).


6

Lifting from this site, I found a "cheap sword (peasant's)", England ~1340, listed at 6 pence. The same site lists the daily wage of a thatcher (in the same time period) as 3 pence. The source is given as "Standards of Living in the Later Middle Ages, Christopher Dyer, Cambridge University Press, 1989". Probably a good source to look into. This does not ...


6

An officer's primary responsibility is the command and control of his men, not combat with the enemy. In consequence, an officer is issued with a weapon of little use in combat at a distance: a pistol. This is deliberate, to help an officer not get so distracted by combat that he neglects the more important responsibility of directing his men. In Infantry ...


5

While I can't find much on when the sword was adopted (at least for the moment) I have found several sources that point towards answers for some of your other questions here. It appears that the method of death varied depending on who you were, or who was punishing you. The following refers to the reign of Caligula. Many men of honourable rank were first ...


5

Normally a sword is worn from a sash or belt worn across the shoulder, known as a baldric. The scabbard is attached to the belt by a contraption of strings and leather known as a frog. In some cases scabbards were made with eyes. In this case, only a cord is needed to hang it from the belt, or it can be hung directly on a shoulder strap. In some cases, ...


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