90

I’ll throw in a vote for Robert “Romeo” Coates, a theatre actor in Britain in the early 1800s. According to Wikipedia (emphasis mine): Despite this ridicule, Coates went on to tour the British Isles. If a theatre manager would hesitate to let him show his talents, he would bribe them. Managers, in turn, often called in the police in case things went ...


64

In old cars you had to turn the wheel a lot further, because there was no power steering. For a feel of that, push a car when the engine is dead and try to steer it without engine assistance (it's hard!). Also the actors would have to act driving with no idea what the screen behind them was doing, and often still do.


62

The poet William McGonagall (born March 1825 and died 29 September 1902) is a famous example. McGonagall has been lampooned as the worst poet in British history. The chief criticisms are that he is deaf to poetic metaphor and unable to scan correctly. His only apparent understanding of poetry was his belief that it needed to rhyme. McGonagall's fame stems ...


49

Florence Foster Jenkins, known as the world's worst opera singer. "No one, before or since, has succeeded in liberating themselves quite so completely from the shackles of musical notation." Despite (or perhaps because of) her technical incompetence, she became a prominent musical cult figure in New York City during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. At ...


46

In addition to the points that Maury Markowitz described, another factor was the large amount of free play in many car steering systems of that era. I was a young kid in the late 1950s, and I distinctly remember getting to sit in the driver's seat of various family cars (while parked, of course) and "drive" them with my hands on the steering wheel. Unlike a ...


26

English As She Is Spoke was so bad it was enjoyable: English As She Is Spoke is the common name of a 19th-century book written by Pedro Carolino, and falsely additionally credited to José da Fonseca, which was intended as a Portuguese–English conversational guide or phrase book, but is regarded as a classic source of unintentional humour, as the given ...


26

Leonid Brezhnev addressed the American public on radio and television the 24th of June, 1973. His speech can be read here and also here. There is a clip of the speech (seemingly wrongly dated 25th of June) on YouTube. He begins with: I highly appreciate this opportunity of directly addressing the people of the United States on my visit to your country. ...


18

turning the wheel wildly to the left and right For the very simple reason that they could not see the images. So you get them to make random motions, because steering straight while the scenery is moving about is even weirder, your brain is telling you the car is not moving because they're not doing anything. In the 1950s the typical technique was to put ...


16

SHORT ANSWER In several respects, it is at best misleading. Ghanaian leader Kwame Nkrumah's primary interests lay in Pan-Africanism and promoting the continent's freedom, independence and unity. He never had any intention of aligning himself with either the Eastern bloc or the West; rather, he sought to play them off against each other to the benefit of his ...


13

SHORT ANSWER The earliest TV program broadcast which can be proven as not being experimental is Charles Francis Jenkins' revolving windmill segment broadcast on the 2nd of July, 1928, but there may have been others before this. While The Queen's Messenger, broadcast in the US on the 11th of September 1928, can probably claim to be the first TV drama, it ...


10

The works of Amanda McKittrick Ros are an example of prose that was so bad it was considered entertaining for its badness. One group who entertained themselves with her work was a group of British literary greats known collectively as the Inklings (J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis were among them). Their main business was to share unpublished works of ...


9

Growing up in the '60's, in towns of 20,000 to 40,000 people, I can attest that Baby Boomers had a freedom that kids today would never dream could exist. We walked to school every day, returned home for lunch, and wandered off for hours at a time on weekends and warm summer days. However, that freedom was closely guarded and protected by the ever-present ...


7

Other answers are correct when mentioning the absence of power steering at the time and the fact that the actor/actress ‘driving’ could not see the screen behind them, but budget and time constraints were also an important factor as was, in some cases at least, cinematic technique. Note also that exaggerated physical movement by actors could make up for a ...


7

I'm going to answer in terms of the paid labour dimensions of gender. There are other elements of the gendered presentation in Mad Men such as gender and sexual identity, reproduction or unpaid labour. Feminisation is the change from a male dominated or mixed gender workforce to a female dominated workforce. Proletarianisation is the degradation of: "...


7

I worked as a clerk and secretary in downtown Toronto 1972 - 1980, in insurance, advertising, banking, and sales organizations. Women were treated like servants compared to men. It wasn't 'personal', it was just the social order. Men recognized that some women were smarter or had more skills than they did, but they were inferior to the male sex in the ...


5

The Germans used U-boats to smuggle Germans and American nationals of German ancestry into the the country for sabotage acts in Operation Pastorius. The operation was a failure. That's probably the origin of the story for the TV series.


4

This is a matter of taste. And "so bad, it's good" is an 'acquired taste'. As a more or less mass phenomenon it is indeed a recent one, although slightly older thatn the question presumes. Tastes differ. Tastes develop. And not all people have the same opinion on what's good, and certainly not all at the same time. It's also quite the difference to see an ...


3

I am not sure if this counts as "transporting" and it did occur in WWI, but an American steward named John Harrison was serving on the ship Margam Abbey. This ship was sunk by a German u-boat and the sailor was picked up by the Captain. He then cruised around a bit while interrogating the sailor. "I ran out on the port side and jumped in the water... I ...


3

I think Radio was more revolutionary - is was the first free (advertiser-paid) real time one-to-many not requiring any skills from the recipient (illiterates can listen) not requiring recipient to withdraw form menial tasks (one can work on a sewing machine while listening - TV actually does not have this feature!) information distribution system. The ...


3

The most relevant portion may be found in this show: YouTube: Webster! Full Episode May 23, 1979 (at ~2 min mark) Transcript: Now. Naturally. Naturally. Within two and through at most three days, I will be meeting my colleagues and those who form the cabinet with me, as many of the caucus members as possible and deciding on the future of the government. I ...


2

The book that leapt to my mind was A Pickle For the Knowing Ones (1848), by Timothy Dexter. The book contained 8,847 words and 33,864 letters, but without punctuation and seemingly random capitalization. Dexter initially handed his book out for free, but it became popular and was reprinted eight times. In the second edition, Dexter added an extra page ...


2

I can get up to 1957. It is the first for the first broadcast of the Spanish Lotería de Navidad (Christmas lottery), as stated here(warning: link in Spanish) and other sources. It is worth commenting: The Christmas lottery was the main lottery event of the year, so I would guess that regular (weekly) lottery events would not be broadcast until later. ...


2

I think you might be thinking of People's Century https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=People%27s+Century


2

Even until the late 1960s to mid 1970s in many industries it was generally expected that when a woman married she would leave her job for full time "family life". One of the so called justifications for paying women less, during that era, was that men were regarded as the "bread winners" and they would support a family, hence a woman ...


1

It very much depends about which country you're asking. I am Dutch, in those days we didn't have advertisements in programs. Only short blocks before and after the news. 'American' in-program advertisements and 24/7 broadcasting came much later, mid or late 70's, if I recall correctly. As far as I know in 1969 in-program advertisements, certainly for a ...


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