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10

Vivian Nutton provides a detailed account for the workings for a Greek/Roman temple like the Asclepeion in his book Ancient Medicine pp. 109-110. At the shrine suppliants would purify themselves at a sacred spring, before offering an appropriate sacrifice, and then, wearing white robes, undergo a second purification before entering the abaton or an ...


8

The Temple of Trajan has not actually been excavated, hence the ambiguity surrounding its fate. However, it is thought to have been at where the 16th century Santa Maria di Loreto is presently located. It was not unusual for Medieval or Renaissance churches to be built on ancient temples. Excavations of the [Loreto] foundations disclosed a number of large ...


6

The statement that the Tanjore Brihadeeswarar Temple or Periya Kovil has more stones than the Giza pyramid is highly doubtful. Here is why: First let us set out some assumptions so as to help us calculate the size of both monuments, otherwise the only way to settle the question is to go and count every block which would be rather tedious. The assumptions I ...


6

I'm not sure what you mean by "secular" - as opposed to the New Testament gospels? There is an abundance of material in the writings of Josephus: specifically in Jewish War and Antiquities of the Jews, both of which were originally written in Greek. He speaks of their philosophical beliefs and the actions of various individual Sadducees, although he writes ...


4

The Talmud says that Onias fled "to Alexandria in Egypt", and "there he built an altar": הלך לאלכסנדריא של מצרים ובנה שם מזבח We may take שם "there" as reference to "Alexandria", but it may also reference "Egypt". IMHO, the second version is corroborated by the citation of Isaiah 19:19 in Menahot 109b: ...


4

The Seleucids ruled over several very different peoples with different cultures, so strictly speaking there is no such thing as "Art and Architecture of the Seleucid empire". There is Hellenistic art but it was common to all Hellenistic states. There is Iranian (Parthian) art of the time when this part of the world was ruled by the Seleucids, and there is ...


4

It's probably more correct to call it part of the Temple complex rather than of the Temple per se, but that's really a matter of definition. The Temple Mount, of which the Western Wall is one of the retaining walls,* is the outermost zone from which, according to Jewish law, certain impure people are excluded; on the other hand, for example, sacrifices can't ...


3

Here are some reasons that might have contributed: Malta is basically a limestone archipelago, with an abundance of Globigerina limestone that is particularly easy to process and use in construction (source). This means that temples were easy to construct, and that the re-use value of their material was relatively low. Malta had little fertile soil, which ...


2

Religious tradition indicates that the Western Wall is a relic of the Temple [Midrash Song of Songs, 2-9], although it is not clear in the text whether the Western Wall is actually part of the Temple or just part of the Temple Mount; In more detailed descriptions of Jewish writings from the time of the house, the wall did not look part of the house but part ...


2

It was apparently destroyed several times. First time by Herostratus: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herostratus According to tradition this happened on 21 July 356 BC.


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