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34 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

Revolution and Power As Lenin famously said, the key question of any revolution is the question of Power. Translating it into the vernacular for the benefit of the unindoctrinated: a revolution is ...
sds's user avatar
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18 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

Revolutions create instability. Edmund Burke said the following after the French Revolution: one of the first and most leading principles on which the commonwealth and the laws are consecrated is ...
Ne Mo's user avatar
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14 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

Old system destroyed, new system not yet established When you observe human behavior in large groups, you will notice a large amount of inertia. Let's take for example British political system. They ...
rs.29's user avatar
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11 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

It's actually very simple. So long as the target of a revolution/movement exists, the solution remains very theoretical: "solve the problem". During this time, everyone in the movement ...
Sterling's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

Why did the Mongol Empire disintegrate so rapidly after its peak?

The reason is that it was too large to be governed effectively. Already Genghis Khan understood this when he split it to uluses and assigned them to his sons. It was supposed that the Great Khan in ...
Alex's user avatar
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9 votes

Why did the Mongol Empire disintegrate so rapidly after its peak?

I'm not sure the "disintegrated so rapidly" assertion is correct. As Alex answered, they dispersed intentionally (into Siberia, China, India, Persia). Second, "so rapid demise of ..." is also ...
J Asia's user avatar
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7 votes

What are the Josephus Greek Epistles?

"Epistle" is Greek for "letter". At the time, the only long-distance communication was by letters or messengers and the writing of eloquent and persuasive letters was a highly ...
John Dallman's user avatar
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7 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

In these kinds of situations, the divide is between the call for "continuing" revolution by some, and the wish by others to "Join the Establishment." Naziism was a "...
Tom Au's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Do historians agree that wars break out because of miscalculations?

No, wars break out because of finite resources and outcome is never 100% certain Wars generally start when there is a finite amount of something ( land, oil, cattle, women, gold ...) and both sides ...
rs.29's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

How historically accurate is "Good King Wencenclaus"?

Wenceslaus I (c. 907-935) was Duke of Bohemia from 921-935. His mother Drahomira was a pagan who persecuted Christians until Wenceslaus took control of the government and exiled her about 924/5. ...
MAGolding's user avatar
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4 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

Marxism is most notorious for 'eating their own" First they cultivate a mindset of revolutionary reaction to perceived or real tyranny Then they kill that generation; so they cant do it again. ...
LazyReader's user avatar
4 votes

Is history always written by the victors?

An interesting article in History Today by Katherine Weikert is devoted to this very topic. The three examples studied in depth are: Byrhtnoth, the Saxon leader who lost - and was killed in - the ...
Felix Goldberg's user avatar
4 votes

What limits historiographically valid hermeneutics of exegesis in relation to theories of action or agents?

I'll apply the same caveat as Mr. Geerkens, and go beyond that to acknowledge that this is a bad answer because it involves no sources. This is a frame challenge. Historians are deeply interested ...
MCW's user avatar
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3 votes

What limits historiographically valid hermeneutics of exegesis in relation to theories of action or agents?

Disclaimer The approach described below is my own. It is informed by my personal life experience, which includes a fascination with history that stretches back over more than five decades. I make no ...
Pieter Geerkens's user avatar
3 votes

Why did the Mongol Empire disintegrate so rapidly after its peak?

The "core" Mongol group was too small, relative to its empire. Even today, "Mongolia" has just over 2 million people. In 1200, it was more like 1 million, with an army of 100,000. Compare this with ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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3 votes

Why you must wait before claiming "historical knowledge"

I am of the opinion that your assertion is flawed. Merriam-Webster simple definition of Historian: a person who studies or writes about history Merriam-Webster simple definition of History: the ...
CGCampbell's user avatar
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2 votes

Why do revolutions "eat their own?" What is the sociological dynamic here?

There are many excellent answers here which I have upvoted. (I'll add that I particularly like the point that revolutionaries are people who like us all are tempted by power which they are loath to ...
Mark Olson's user avatar
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1 vote

Was the attack on Pearl Harbor totally unexpected?

If the question is Did the US Administration expect an attack at Pearl Harbor by significant Japanese forces? then the answer HAS to be NO. The US Pacific Fleet was concentrated and ...
J. Taylor's user avatar
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