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26

The other two answers speak in terms of Tibet's legal status; and these answers, while correct, don't properly explain why Tibet is important to China. This answer relates entirely to geography. The motives: Short Answer: 1. Tibet has control of most the water in China; the Huang He and the Chang Jiang originate there. If you exercise control these two ...


13

tl;dr Why invade? Because government, in order to be legitimate (I'm using the term "legitimate" in the same sense as Fukyama - that the citizens perceive the government's actions as appropriate and that the citizens support and endorse the government. THe term is different from "strength", but that is a different question), must exercise governmental ...


10

The short version is that to the minds of a lot of Chinese, that was historically Chinese territory. They were just reclaiming what was theirs. A lot of modern Chinese territorial claims go back to the Manchurian "Qing" dynasty, which ran China from 1644 to 1912. At its greatest extent, the Qing ruled a very expansive territory that included Manchuria, ...


10

Although interested parties disagree in very fundamental questions, it seems that both of them agree in that it was an uprising. Tibetans in exile commemorate it in the Tibetan Uprising Day, the Dalai Lama refers to it as uprising, and for the Chinese government it was a reactionary uprising of the Tibetan elite (according to Wikipedia). World history in ...


8

I'd say, from the partial emblem on the front, that the aircraft was part of the USAF 322d Airlift Division (Combat Cargo) in 1962-3. According to this article the "[322 Air Division] sent a squadron of C-130 Hercules to India just after the end of the 1962 hostilities with China". To give credit where it's due, @TomMcW & @Gerry on the Aviation board ...


7

There is an ancient relationship with Tibet, but it is with the Mongols, not with China. During the Yuan dynasty, Tibet was part of the Mongol Yuan empire, but not part of Yuan China. They were two entirely separate administrative units, that happened to share one ruler. It is true that the office administering Tibet was located in Beijing, but it was an ...


5

Korea King Jumong, who founded the Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, was the son of Hae Mo-su of Buyeo who was reputed to be a "son of Heaven". Later, Goguryeo's spiritual successor state of Goryeo styled their rulers "son of heaven", but only internally. Externally, or specifically when dealing with China, the Goryeo monarchs styled themselves merely kings. ...


4

I'm not really sure we can apply the concept of "state religion" to Imperial Tibet. While Buddhism thrived during this period, many court ministers and nobles remained faithful to their Bön beliefs throughout. Even at the height of Buddhist power, powerful court ministers were still Bon believers. This would prove instrumental. As you noted Buddhism reached ...


3

Using my elite Amazon search skills, I discovered Tibet: A History by Sam van Schaik, which looks like what you want. Personally, I'm a fan of reading literature and/or biographies, as I find concrete stories give me a better handle on the more abstract cultural or political issues covered in a regular history. Sardathrion's books look interesting, as does ...


2

Tantric Buddhism absorbed many of the Bon (shaman) concepts and the two religions co-existed in many ways. It was more an overlay of Buddist theology over Shaman practice and beliefs, than a total ousting of one by the other. On the other hand with respect to the previously warlike Tibetan Empire which the Chinese had feared, with the adoption of Buddhist ...


1

An incidental cause would of course be the presence of an independent Tibetan communist party. The extensive solitary suffered by Wangye is indicative of the vehemence with which the CCP opposed an independently communist Tibet. Goldstein, Melvyn C. Goldstein/Sherap, Dawei Sherap/Siebenschuh, William R.. A Tibetan Revolutionary: The Political Life and ...


1

There is an article on Tibet on Wikipedia. Emerging with control over most of mainland China after the Chinese Civil War, the People's Republic of China incorporated Tibet in 1950 and negotiated the Seventeen Point Agreement with the newly enthroned 14th Dalai Lama's government, affirming the People's Republic of China's sovereignty but granting the area ...


1

Made my comments into a provisory and partial answer. In western Tibet it seems the kingdoms of Guge, Purang, Mar-yul, Yar tse and Zanskar were still around by the 11th century. Couldn't find anything from eastern tibet, unfortunately. When Nima-gon died around 930AD, Mnah-ris (Ngaris), the Western Tibetan Empire, was divided among his three sons: Pelgyi-...


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