72

Why? Because there was no point. First, according to more modern astronomical measurements, the current length of the year is closer to about 365.2422 days, so they would've been relatively less accurate had they used a more precise value of 365.2425463 days per year. Which leads to a very important point about math: you need to be very mindful about how ...


19

The Gregorian Calendar was introduced (to the Catholic World) in 1582, the result of preparation over the preceding five or so years. However the popularization of decimal fractions would wait another three years until the publication of La Thiende [The Tenth] in 1585 by the Flemish mathematician Simon Stevin. Though not the inventor of a decimal ...


7

Your question could mean a couple of different things. The ancient Greeks didn't date historical events by use of a calendar. They had local calendars to regulate events during the year, but: By contrast [to the modern calendar], the Attic calendar had little interest in ordering the sequence of years. As in other Greek cities, the name of one of the yearly ...


6

None of those watches are worth anything, they are all quartz watches with generic movements. Each one could be bought on ebay for less than 10 dollars.


4

The existing answers are good, but I would add one additional detail, building on your concept of "future-proofing": The exercise of reforming a calendar was intended to make a calendar more accurate, but was not intended to eliminate the need for any theoretical future adjustment. The Gregorian reform was inspired by the Julian reform, and the ...


3

The other answers have touched some very good points, but there is a mathematical point I would like to make as well: The way the leap year rules are designed is fundamentally incompatible with the decimal expansion. Specifically, rules of the kind "leap/no leap year every X years" don't really care about the number of digits, they are more of a ...


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