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60

Short answer: No. The only film footage of the RMS Titanic shows her being towed into the outfitting wharf at Belfast in February 1912, and moored at Belfast. A clip of Lusitania leaving port has often been shown as a substitute for Titanic's maiden voyage commencement (including in the 1958 film 'A Night to Remember*). No footage of Titanic leaving ...


44

It would appear to be true, according to this Wikipedia entry. ... passengers and crew headed to the stern, where Father Thomas Byles was hearing confessions and giving absolutions, Edited with suggestion from @sempaiscuba This BBC report adds that Father Byles refused to leave the ship, and stayed to comfort passengers, leading recently to calls for ...


30

tl; dr Virtually all the Third Class (steerage) passengers were intending to emigrate. The majority were headed to the United States, while the rest intended to journey onward to Canada. For passengers in steerage, their voyage on the Titanic was intended to be a one-way trip. The vast majority of Second Class ticket holders, who were not already US citizens,...


13

No, no sign of the Titanic's compass platform has ever been found. The location of the Compass Platform is shown on this plan of the Titanic's Boat Deck, and this plan of the ship's profile. You can see it was located directly above the First Class Lounge. The Compass Platform contained the ship's "standard compass", against which all others would be ...


10

That's a difficult question to answer. Partly yes, partly no. Yes: He received at least 6 messages warning for icebergs in the area. Nevertheless, he ordered full speed. No: The Titanic didn't have enough lifeboats. Even if there was time enough to evacuate all passengers and crew, the loss of life would have been enormous. No: The Titanic had more ...


10

There are probably very few large projects for which there is more information. It wasn't that long ago, and things that large aren't just built on a whim; they are carefully designed in detail, and then built from the plans. So we still have the original blueprints, as well as some less detailed drawing like deck plans. It would probably be possible to ...


10

Probably no. Introduction of Yoga in earnest to the West only occurred from the late 1920s onwards. The likelihood of any of the few early adopters being on the Titanic is low; especially as no Indian nationals were on the passenger manifest.


10

Not of the ship sinking but there is one of the suspected iceberg it hit. The photo was taken from a ship sailing in the area some time later. As it passed by an iceberg someone noticed there were paint stains near the waterline. It was the only iceberg in the vicinity of the wreck Also a salvage vessel took some shots of a lifeboat picked up with a ...


8

Another remark beside the problems of climbing an iceberg: A quote from Wikipedia: Hit an iceberg 11:40 p.m. (ship's time) 14 April 1912 on her maiden voyage and sank 2 h 40 min later After 1 hour the grade of the ship was 5°, an hour later the grade didn't change a lot (from in German Wikipedia). There was no obvious reason of a danger in the begin of ...


6

While on the open sea, the helmsman follows the course, as ordered by the officer of the deck (OOD). Before radar, lookouts were used to identify passing ships, and obstacles, with the information relayed to the OOD, who then made decisions, and passed orders on to the engine room, and the helmsman. When entering a harbor, a harbor pilot would take the ...


6

There would have been problems with people from the Titanic trying to climb on to the iceberg that resulting in the ship sinking. To begin with, ice is slippery and from the picture you linked to, the iceberg looked like it had steep sides. Getting onto a steep sided slippery iceberg would be very difficult to do. Staying on the cold, wet, slippery sides ...


6

The calculation is easy; Britanica article states: "However, the Carpathia was some 58 nautical miles (107 km) away when it received the signal, and it would take more than three hours to reach the Titanic." So if Californian was 5 miles away, it would take at least 15 minutes. The Carpathia received the distress call at 12:20 am; the Titanic did not ...


5

This is the old problem of proving a negative, but there is no evidence for a known group photo showing all of the Titanic's deck officers. Given the large number of Titanic books, sites and "enthusiasts", it seems highly improbable that such a photo would not have appeared somewhere online. Further, one officer only joined the Titanic shortly before she ...


4

The link mentioned by Steve Bird is relevant, but it is also important to recall that the North Atlantic is renowned for the ferocity of its storms and heavy seas. When your view is changing from this to this every few seconds, the temperature is -20C with a 40 knot wind blowing salt spray across the foredeck, the helmsman tended to perform much more ...


4

The painting of HMS Birkenhead (Birkenhead drill) shows the band playing and soldiers/sailors standing fast. Incredible bravery shown by men who knew the sharks were waiting.


3

I've heard stories about rebuilding the Titanic for decades, literally. First stories I (personally) heard were in 1995. So far, nothing remotely materialized. I doubt very much if such a project will ever come to fruition. You ask if there are enough references. That's one issue. I look at other issues that are at least as important as having the right ...


3

I would say: yes it was. Until now, probably the only ship in history. Throughout maritime history, many ocean liners hired musicians and bands to play for the passengers This is not entirely correct. "Throughout maritime history" creates and impression of an age old tradition. In fact, passenger transport only became important cargo after the invention ...


2

Indeed, Carpathia had a lot of spare space. The problem was, most of that space was steerage. After a refit in 1905, Carpathia could carry 2450 people, according to the statement given by captain Ronson to the US Senate Inquiry commission, 250 in first and second class combined, and 2200 in third class dormitories. The captain might've been off, though - he ...


2

The assumption that the person at the helm needs to see things is based on the assumption that the person at the helm makes decisions about which way the ship should turn. However, the person who turns the helm is usually following the orders of an officer who has a good view from a different position on the ship and/or other sources of information about ...


2

No. The Titanic disaster is quite unique. Sailing through iceberg infested waters was rare during the age of sail, for several reasons: Mass passenger transport ships didn't exist. Ships carried some passengers, but weren't designed as passenger ships. Therefore the loss of life could be substantial, but nowhere near that of the Titanic. Why would someone ...


1

I saw the same video of the sinking of titanic on YouTube and I compared it to the 1997 movie and as far as I can tell they were identical. But I noticed that the windows on the waterline were different than in the movie. So I looked on other movies like The Night to Remember. Bingo! I found an exact similarity to the Titanic lights going out. I looked at ...


1

In addition to the other issues already mentioned, there are a number of problems when thinking of building an authentic replica of the Titanic. The Titanic was built with the best technology of 1900. It was also an attempt to build a passenger ship larger than any previous examples, with the architects facing new problems for the first time. In retrospect, ...


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