33

The explanation seems to be related to the attempted spelling of the Arabic for Osman, which came out as utman or Uthman. From wiktionary.org From Middle French Ottoman, from post-classical Latin Ottomanus, from Ottoman Turkish عثمان, from Arabic personal name عُثْمَان (ʿuṯmān). Osman is the Turkish spelling of the male Arabic given name Uthman, ...


20

My area of focus is medieval Britain (I wrote a book on medieval names found in Yorkshire), and in that context I can attest to villages and even smaller places having names. And there were a lot of them. Just a quick scan through a manor court roll will give you a lot of place names, sometimes of places that have been subsumed into larger cities today, and ...


16

Some villages had histories and thus names going back to Ancient Roman times. A case in point is Matreium in the Austrian Alps, a small village then and now. So the statement that medieval villages didn't have names can hardly be true in an absolute sense. As to whether villages were frequently innominate (as the verbatim quote claims), I'm not sure. As ...


15

Originally, there was a lot of confusion about Antarctic nomenclature, with many different countries making different claims and names at different times. For example, this is one notice from 1912: The plateau around the South Pole was named by Amundsen after King Haakon VII. Sir Ernest Shackleton points out, very, very politely, that Amundsen must ...


10

Sylvan means "woods. "Transylvania was first referred to in a Medieval Latin document in 1075 as ultra silvam, meaning "beyond the forest" (ultra meaning "beyond" or "on the far side of" and the accusative case of sylva (sylvam) "woods, forest"). Transylvania, with an alternative Latin prepositional prefix, means "on the other side of the woods". Wikipedia ...


10

Ascertaining details in legends might be a good thing. But it is a legend and curiously lacks detail, leaving open a huge space for projections and arbitrary symbols, to be filled by listeners. And perhaps to the detriment of flower sellers who have a more complicated time instead of always stocking for example coffee flowers, or others. It might be more ...


9

Originally English tended to use Somaliland for the region and Italian used Somalia. The two protectorates or territories were usually called British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland in English, and Somalia Britannica and Somalia Italiana in Italian. After independence and unification in 1960, the new country called itself the Somali Republic which was ...


9

According to the Oxford Companion to Archaeology, the term New Kingdom was introduced by the German historian Eduard Meyer in his Geschichte des Altertums. English Egyptologists adopted his usage, displacing their earlier designation of the period as the "Empire". Source: Silberman, Neil Asher, and Alexander A. Bauer, eds. The Oxford Companion to ...


8

Plenty of village names come from the medieval times, so yes, they've existed. An example for the origin of such names can be the usual profession of its habitants. That of course led to existence of several villages with the same name around bigger area. Polish language Wikipedia a provides us with a nice list of such names followed by professions, but they'...


8

Medieval villages in Britain certainly had names. Even before the Domesday survey, carried out under William the Conquerer shortly after his takeover of the English throne, towns and vilages had names. Rural areas too, were named, often for geographical features, the local Lord, or the Church (Kirkby, for example). Former Roman fort-towns were know (are ...


8

The ancient Roman Republic was referred to as the Senatus PopulusQue Romanus ("The Senate and People of Rome") (abbreviated SPQR) as early as the first century BC, but it is unclear when, if ever, this was the official name of the country as opposed to being just a useful or favored descriptive term.


8

Ok, this is an answer to the literal question, not the spirit of the question: The largest place named after an animal is the Tadpole Galaxy as it has a volume in the millions of cubic light years and appears to be the only named galaxy named after an animal.


8

Your question appears to be based upon a false assumption: As far back as 1590, the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum showed that the northern part of the New World was known as "America Mexicana" (Mexican America), as México City was the seat for the New Spain viceroyalty. New Spain is mistaken as the old name for México, rather than the name of a large of ...


8

No, that doesn't seem a likely explanation, not after 750 years of reconquista. The answer is for now: we don't know. From Wikipedia: Spanish explorers in the 16th century, when they first discovered the Baja California peninsula west of the Sea of Cortez, at first thought the peninsula to be a large island. The name "California" was applied to the ...


8

This reminds me a bit of the old internet hacker/cracker argument. Originally "hacking" was a word for any generalized kind of computer tinkering, and had largely positive connotations. However, mass media felt the most interesting facet of hacking was computer security intrusion, and proceeded to act is if that's all the word meant. A lot of us on the ...


6

As near as I can tell, it is standard Army practice to label hills in an operating area by their height in meters. That means for all those hills you listed, the number is their height. This is probably also why the important hills near the coast tend to have smaller numbers. This practice does not appear to have changed recently, so I'd assume it is still ...


6

The book Historic Spots in California: Fifth Edition claims the term moro was used to indicate anything black, and that tradition says that a lame black horse gave the name to this particular tract of land The horse story is repeated in the Encyclopedia of California entry on Castroville, which also includes a possible reference to black soil of the ...


6

HISTORICAL (NAMED) ANIMALS Alexander the Great, in addition to naming numerous cities after himself, also named cities after his horse, Bucephalus, (example: Alexandria Bucephalous and Phalia), and one city after his dog, Peritas. This is also cited by John Kistler: Just as Alexander’s horse Bucephalus would have cities names in his honor, so Peritas had ...


5

From what I gathered, without knowing which book it was you were reading, both towns appear to have been two mining centers, established by the mining company El Boleo, and they must have just taken their names from existing landmarks (mountains or streams – there's a Purgatorio stream near Santa Rosalía, in the center of that mining area). In any case, ...


5

I will answer the part of your question about these four specific names. The Persian names for Holland and Germany are recent borrowings from French. Lehestān is borrowed from Turkish and derives from the name of the Lendians, a Slavic tribe who once lived in what is now Poland. Hend is an Arabicised form of Middle Persian hindūg, Old Persian hindū-, ...


5

The word 'Galldachd' for the lowlands arises from the Old Irish 'gall' for 'foreigner' which came in turn from the Latin word 'gallus' for a Gaul. http://www.wordsense.eu/Gall/#Old_Irish. The Gaels called (indeed call) their linguistically and culturally Gaelic part of Scotland the Gàidhealtachd, usually translated as 'Gaeldom'. This cultural way of ...


5

The decision to rename the place from Zabrze to Hindenburg in 1914/15 was not unique to this "big village". WP: Belomorskoje: Belomorskoje (russisch Беломорское, deutsch Hindenburg, bis 1918 Groß Friedrichsgraben I) was renamed in 1918 for exactly he same reason, nationalistic proud and fervour, making it necessary to rename Zabrze once more from ...


5

Mexica is the Nahuatl or "Aztec" name for the original group of "Aztecs." Over the course of several centuries, these "Mexicans" conquered the whole Central Valley of what we now call "Mexico," thereby creating the "Aztec" empire. "Mexica" is the core of this empire. The Spanish added chunks of modern Mexico (and central America) to the Aztec empire, which ...


5

This happened in Turkey, as part of a deliberate attempt to replace old names: Approximately 12,000 village names that are non-Turkish, understood to originate from non-Turkish roots, and identified as causing confusion have been examined and replaced with Turkish names, and put into effect by the Substitution Committee for Foreign Names functioning at ...


5

It was two different farms with the same name (Bull, Akers historie, p. 11). (The map shows the oldest names, from the Bronze age or earlier.) So Skøyenåsen belonged to Nordre Skøyen in East Aker.


4

There are many Geo political reasons for that. Most of the other names are kept by other countries. India is called India (from Indus) because British kept it. Its called Hindustan (Land of Hindus) because Arabs kept it. Germans call their country Deutschland but internationally it is called as Germany. It is the same as we have synonyms in any language for ...


4

Historically, every country had many different names - what they called themselves, and what others called them. Conquerors came and said "This is now SomethingLand" while the people who lived there were already calling it "OurIsland" in their language or "LandOfTrees" in their language or whatever. [There is a claim that "Canada" comes from an Iroquoian ...


4

It is a literal translation of the Sino-Vietnamese phrase "Tử cấm thành": Tử means Purple, Cấm means Forbidden, and Thành means City. "Purple" here refers to the Purple Forbidden enclosure, a group of stars in Chinese constellations, the legendary residence of the Emperor of Heaven. It should be noted that the Purple Forbidden City has only been so called ...


4

The earliest relevant usage in any English language source that I could confirm via Google Books was Somaliland in 1783. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the term Somalia dates to 1814 and is of "unknown origin". So Somaliland appears to be the "original" English name, but was rarely used until later on. The terms British Somaliland and ...


4

According to this: http://www.bibelwissenschaft.de/wibilex/das-bibellexikon/lexikon/sachwort/anzeigen/details/neues-reich-3/ch/746c4a4853fde241e7777581bf2e29c9/ the designation “Neues Reich” was in use since 1834. This was about 20 years before the birth of Eduard Meyer.


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