Hot answers tagged

34

If you get rich in a business you soon find that you have no reasonable 'line of work' for your money, or in other word: capital. So you get essentially too rich for meaningful expansion in your core business. And now you can start either to waste it around for personal luxuries or other consumption — or you throw your money around as an 'investor' or money ...


30

According to this database (specifically the spreadsheet file, column D) a 100kg of rye bread cost 8.22 guilder in the western Netherlands in 1645, which should at least give you a rough idea to start with. (Here is the same spreadsheet shared on Google Docs for convenience). Using @JustCal's suggestion of 3lb per loaf, this works out to roughly 0.1 guilder ...


25

"Banning harmful imports" was often done. Prime example being the satanic brew. Coffee was banned in Mecca, Italy, Contantinople/Ottoman Empire, Prussia. Similarly: tea was banned in East Frisia, were and when it was already the national drink. Like all other illict drugs today, they were thought of being too stimulating and foment free thought, and ...


20

I don't think you're going to find anything close to the precision you are asking for here. And as DevSolar has commented I think you are way off the mark by specifying prices in gold. I do have one example for you though: In his Autobiography Benjamin Franklin recounts his journey as a young man in 1723 from Boston to Philadelphia by way of New York (and ...


13

Assuming you accept books as an answer (and your comment suggests that you do) there are at least two wiki pages that list books that have been banned by governments: List of books banned by governments List of authors and works on the Index Librorum Prohibitorum, which is to say the Vatican's list. As you will find from going through the list, books have ...


11

No. In 1814 a Scotsman by the name of John Cameron jumped ship. He later changed his name to Gilroy. Here's some info from the city of Gilroy California web page. John Cameron was born in a southern district of Inverness-shire, Scotland in 1794. At 19, he left home, hiring aboard a British trading ship which arrived, in 1814, at what was then the Spanish ...


9

Question: Why were so many of the earliest banks founded by cloth merchants? Also the Medici Bank. One of the most important banks in Medieval Europe who it's said financed the Renaissance. I would imagine that since cloth is non-perishable, cloth merchants might least need to loan and lend money, since stockpiles are most predictably managed. ...


7

There are actually a number of placental mammals which can be found across the Wallace Line in Australia and New Guinea. The one which probably is most relevant to the question about deliberate human involvement in the process would be the dog (or dingo), which was most likely introduced and dispersed into New Guinea and Australia from South-East Asia by ...


5

I originally wanted to close this as a duplicate of this question, How was security on the Silk Road between China and the West maintained?, because the primary answer answers this question as well: Few people ever traveled the full length of the Silk Road. The goods were transported by a series of routes and agents. This mode meant that local agents, ...


5

Well, there was trade between the Mali Empire and the rest of the world via a Sahel camel-borne trade route established and run by the Berber tribes of that region. We know at least a few non-Berbers traveled that route as well as travelers or pilgrims, but all the direct trade would almost certainly be carried out by the Berbers, not Europeans. The ...


4

Because it wouldn't have done either of them much good. Australia didn't house a settled agricultural society, with major population centers to trade with. Where it was closest to Indonesia, it was instead until quite recently very sparsely populated with roving bands of hunter-gatherers. According to McEvedy and Jones, there were in the neighborhood of 250,...


4

The premise of the question is wrong, trade as such is not a matter where unanimity is required. Negotiations follow the procedure laid out in article 218 TFEU, with most votes in the Council taking place according to the qualified majority voting procedure. And the common commercial policy has always been an exclusive competence of the EU. So no country had ...


4

Short answer The qualified majority was introduced for trade deals with the Nice Treaty Drafted 11.12.2000 Signed 26.02.2001 Effected 01.02.2003 Summary of the treaty of Nice Exceptions were made (and still valid today) for 2 trade deal types: EU-only: QMV Art. 207:2 TFEU Article 133 of the EC Treaty: for the negotiation and conclusion of international ...


4

According to Cooper by Woolfenden & Elkinton, pp. 24-31: California's new governor, Luis Argüello, purchased Juan Bautista Rogers Cooper's ship Rover in December 1823. The vessel was loaded with seal pelts and sent to Canton, first making stops in Honolulu, Fanning Island, and Manila. It reached Canton in June 1824, returning to Bodega Bay by October 23,...


2

These Russians probably weren't big news: numerous Russian voyages had already stopped in Chile. By 1827 Talcahuano was "a resting-place indicated in the Admiralty instructions". N. A. Ivashintsov in Russian Round-the-World Voyages, 1803-1849 indicates that: the Rurik spent a month at Talcahuano in 1816 the Predpriiatie spent six weeks at Talcahuano in 1824 ...


2

To the excellent answers here, I would add that cloth merchants before the industrial revolution would have aggregated the production of large numbers of suppliers and delivered products to large numbers of purchasers, including foreign purchasers. This put them in a position where they naturally ended up doing considerable amounts of factoring. From ...


1

Because it is non-perishable, cloth makes good collateral. Lenders like to have something to use for security. Land might serve this purpose, but it was monopolized by the nobility. The (middle class) "merchants" had few hard goods to put up as security for a loan, but one of them was their "stock in trade." If they didn't repay, the lender would liquidate ...


1

This is probably not a very good answer, although perhaps it provides some context. There is evidence that the Indus valley people migrated towards Sumer, and conducted trade with Oman and the present day orient, by boat, from 3000BC until later civilizations used the same trade route in 350BC. The details of Indus valley chronology and trade are ...


1

The Indus Valley civilization started declining around 1700 BCE. The Bronze Age transitioned into the Iron age also referred to as PGW(Painted Greyware)-Iron age, somewhere around 1000-1100 BCE (Iron was discovered in burial sites near Gandhara). There was no abrupt collapse of the bronze age. . The conventional viewpoint is that at this stage that mixing ...


1

Calcutta was very close to Ghazipur City (in present day Bihar). Ghazipur has an excellent climate for growing poppy and also had the Ganga River nearby which provided an optimum amount of water for its cultivation. The website of Ghazipur City says- .In 1764 AD Britishers won Buxar and Ghazipur which was therafter ruled by East India Company . Company ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible