56

Long ago, in 16 century they used open fire in fair weather (with all possible precautions) on the deck to cook (ref. Morison, Admiral of the Ocean Sea). When the sea was rough, only cold food could be served. Later they used galleys of higher and higher sophistication, but still mostly in the good weather. There was no other way to heat oneself, except ...


18

There were several ways to stay warm. Not that any of them were exactly great. First winter travel was rare. Next is the fact that passengers (not crew) would not really go above deck much. They mostly just traveled below deck. If we're sticking with just passengers, and not talking about crew, and if we're talking about "the age of sail" then mostly the ...


15

Trans-Atlantic passenger travel was not very popular until the advent of the steamer, and yet men and women crossed the ocean periodically, including the affluent. Trans-Atlantic passenger travel didn't exist before the advent of steam power. It became possible because of steam power. Before, people had to have very good reasons for traveling. Migrating ...


11

Streets in ancient Mesopotamia had names. A 1975 study of ancient Sippar by Rikvah Harris at the Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten (http://www.nino-leiden.nl/download/3235) found mention of several named streets in the early 2nd Miillennium BCE, for example: An account which mentions taxes owed by Sin-remenni describes him as a resident of ...


10

The Catacombs of Paris contain the remains of more than 6 million people, and much like the San Francisco situation the catacombs were established to alleviate overflowing cemeteries throughout Paris. These catacombs were built using defunct mines and quarries spread out underneath Paris, and millions of remains were moved there from cemeteries across the ...


10

Merriam-Webster dates the first usage of red flag meaning "a warning signal" to 1748, but it does not cite the example. However, the Collins Dictionary Trends of 'red flag' graph lends support to this early usage Still well before railways, the earliest actual example of the use of red for a warning I've found is in this Wikipedia note: 1777 Philip ...


9

For central Europe, between 1925-1930 may be considered realistic. For France possibly sooner due to a higher motorized density between 1920 and 1930. The transition was uneven due to certain conditions commercial was faster than private motorised vehicles but the private use was probably a much smaller percentage than commercial, so in a city a ...


8

Well, the truck was definitely real, not an artists concept sketch. An image gallery at the Nevada Department of Transportation website shows the following picture: The caption simply labels it as an 'Early Department of Highways truck." Many other interesting images in this gallery, Historical Image Gallery 1917-1939, which gives us a date range, but no ...


8

I'm not sure there was a 'typical' speed. Most that I've read about have a speed in the range 9 - 11 knots. Some examples include: The tramp steamer SS Monarch was launched in 1885, and had a design speed of approximately 10 knots. The SS Daleby was built in 1900, and had a speed of 9.5 knots. The Sizergh Castle was launched in 1903, and had a speed of 9 ...


5

Singapore: over 250,000 individual graves exhumed, and more will follow. Reasonably accurate estimates of the number of individual graves exhumed can be established for Singapore where more than 20 cemeteries have been cleared. By 1985, 21 cemeteries had been cleared, and an approximate 120,000 graves had been exhumed by the Housing Development Board. ...


4

Until early 1871, when cable communication between Singapore and London was first established, it would take quite a while for information to travel between the two locations. Suez shortened the trip abruptly beginning in 1869, and there were many improvements to travel speeds throughout the century, but it was always measured in weeks. That pretty much ...


4

Originally, ten locomotives were entered for the Rainhill Trials. In the event, only five took part. Cycloped, Novelty, Perseverance, Rocket, and Sans Pareil. The locomotives were to be transported to the Liverpool & Manchester Railway’s Millfield Yard where they were to be assembled ahead of the trials. Most were transported by sea to Liverpool, and ...


3

The Atlantic ocean stretches from pole to pole, more or less, and there's generally no good reason to stay in the coldest parts of it. Consider the 16th-century trade routes: And also the "clipper route": You'll notice they didn't spend a lot of time in the high northern latitudes.


3

In the first century in Damascus, there was a "street called Straight". Here it is in Acts 9:11 Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus named Ananias; and to him the Lord said in a vision, “Ananias.” And he said, “Here I am, Lord.” So the Lord said to him, “Arise and go to the street called Straight, and inquire at the house of Judas for one called ...


2

The rural population was indeed a significant source of demand for cars. From 1911 to 1920 the number of automobiles owned by farmers increased 21 times, while overall registrations increased 13 times. By 1920, more than a quarter of cars were owned by farmers. Rural doctors were also heavy buyers of cars, as they could serve a wider area, respond to calls ...


1

This question is way too basic and can be answered with a single link: In 1912, New York, London and Paris traffic counts all showed more cars than horses for the first time. — Raymond A. Mohl: "The Making of Urban America", p124, Rowman & Littlefield, 1997. For personal traffic transport it was even: The turning point in the change from horse ...


1

Before the cable communication, and long time after that, newspapers from England were available in colonies only by subscription, and they arrived long after their publication. There is ample evidence of this in the literature. People in colonies learned about the news with large delay.


1

Did a google map thing and followed the coastline as close as possible, came out to 700 miles give or take. That is 608.something nautical miles, so call that 600 for easy math. More googling shows a few papers citing 4.something knots as the average speed of the average ship of the time. At a speed of 4 knots (4 nm/hr) call it 100nm per 24 hr period. So ...


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