Hot answers tagged

62

SHORT ANSWER Yes, there were some restrictions on movement during the period 1347 - 51 but mostly (with a few exceptions such as some city states and Poland) they were haphazard and depended on local or personal initiatives and / or religion rather than national governments. Invariably, the measures that were taken were too little, too late. Further, ...


57

Google Books has a copy of Bradshaw's Guide from 1887. To get to Paris, they recommended one of four options: The numbers in the three rightmost columns are, respectively: approximate first-class fare (in pounds, shillings, and pence); approximate second-class fare; and time (in days and hours.) The absolute quickest door-to-door route was via ...


47

The answers to 1, 2 are very simple. The Soviet Union presented itself as a "communist paradise." That is, a country where life was better than in capitalist countries. This was the main justification for communist power and social order. People traveling abroad could immediately see that this was not the case. When this had become evident to a sufficient ...


47

Your concerns about money notwithstanding, they almost certainly would have taken the train. In the early 1900s, the United States had a well-developed rail network (see, for example, this map from 1918), and it was by far the cheapest form of long-distance transportation for both passengers and freight. A farm family would most likely have walked or ...


41

The news reached London on the 10th of August. It was, of course, known by British officials in the colonies much earlier, but It is astonishing how casually the Declaration was first reported to official London. On July 8 ex-Governor Tryon in New York wrote to Lord George Germain, the colonial secretary, and Admiral Shuldham wrote to the Admiralty ...


34

SHORT ANSWER Yes, there were, but information on inns and hostels before around 1300 is patchy at best and the evidence suggests that, for the early middle ages, travellers were often given board and lodging by locals, especially those higher up the social hierachy. After 1300, though, there are an increasing number of references to inns and hostels as well ...


31

The Nemi ships Caligula built two barges on Lake Nemi, one of which was essentially a floating palace. The key here is that the ships were on a lake, not on the ocean. Dying at sea is a lot harder when you aren't at sea. Smaller waves help with the seasickness situation. I would imagine that large, lazy rivers would be suitable for 'cruises' as well.


28

The Danish King Erik I Ejegod (The Good) died in Paphos, Cyprus, 1736 miles / 2794 km from the then capital of Denmark, Roskilde. Erik, who was born around 1056 or 1060 and reigned from 1095 to 1103, was the fourth of five brothers (sons of Sweyn II Estridsson) who all became King of Denmark (not concurrently, they reigned at different times between 1076 ...


26

Not repeating info in the other answer(s), but it should be realized that by the time the Declaration of Independence was written, the Battles of Lexington and Concord were already more than a year old (April 19, 1775), as was the Colonials' Continental Army (June 1775). Parliament in London by this time was already quite certain they had an organized ...


25

There is a tunnel under a mountain in Samos built around 530 BC. It is described by Herodotus, book III, 60. In 1882 a tunnel which matches Herodotus description has been actually found. It is one kilometer long and 2 times 2 meters in cross section, so its dimensions suggest that people walked through it. What is especially amazing about this tunnel is ...


22

Short answer While it is true that there was no specific legal requirement for Americans entering the US to have a passport prior to WWI, passengers were not unused to being required to present some kind of documentation even before 1900. In fact, the documents which they were likely to need when visiting many areas overseas would also get them back into ...


20

Some of the early lines of Chaucer's prologue to The Canterbury Tales (circa 1386), tell of The Tabard inn in Southwark, just south of London Bridge. In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage To Caunterbury with ful devout corage, At nyght was come into that hostelrye Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye Of sondry folk, by aventure ...


20

Very likely Grand Prince Yaroslav II Vsevolodich or one of the many other princes in Eastern Europe who were ordered to go to Mongolia and died there. Mikhail Yaroslavich of Tver was canonized for his bravery in making the trip to the Mongol capital of Sarai, knowing that the Mongols would probably execute him (which they did, on 22 November 1318), although ...


19

Several memoirs of the period suggest that the Berlin to Vienna journey very likely could be completed in 12 days or less. This matches up fairly closely to @Eugene's estimate of two weeks. However, one account suggests that someone with more limited resources and unexpected delays could easily take much more time. The route they [1,2,3,4] usually seem to ...


18

Short answer: no. In general, nobody got "rides" in the ancient world because there were no rides, everybody walked for the most part. Carts were only used to carry cargo, not passengers. You would not want to try to ride in a cart because they had no suspension. Try this: get in a wheelbarrow with a wooden (or iron) wheel (not a pneumatic wheel) and have a ...


18

It took between 7 and 10 days, depending on the ship and the weather. The ships sailed out of Liverpool and Queenstown. Here is a notice from "London and Its Environs: Handbook for Travellers" (1889):


17

Straight-line distance from Berlin to Vienna is 523 kilometers or 325 miles according to Wolfram Alpha. In a car traveling at a constant speed of 55 miles per hour (ca. 88 km/h), total travel time would be 5 hours and 55 minutes. However, roads are not perfectly straight. According to Google Maps the shortest route is 678 km long and you would need at least ...


17

It seems that it's a mock-up image produced as publicity for the passenger model of the 747 aircraft by Boeing/Pan-American Airways. It would have to have been from the late 1960s, since the 747 entered service with Pan Am in January 1970.


17

Update (more updates following the original post): It has been expressed as dubious that children in 1911 could bicycle this distance with their parents. Let's investigate that. The current road distance Indianapolis to Dallas is 900 miles; let's call it 1000 miles in 1911. Rural school age children of 1911 routinely walked for 60 to 90 minutes twice a day ...


14

I visited East Berlin and Dresden in 1978 with my mother and sister ( I was 18 at the time) from the USA. We had to obtain visas many months prior to our visit from a travel agent who specialized in this. When we arrived at each of our destinations we had to register with the city officials (listing where we were staying and for how long). As I recall we ...


13

The percentage of Americans traveling overseas doubled between 1860 and 1900, but overseas tourism was still very rare at the end of the century (only .16% of the population per annum). Americans in 2009 were around 10 times as likely to visit Europe as were Americans in 1900. The Historical Statistics of the United States records how many Americans were "...


13

According to this article in Hinduism Today (July/August/September 2008), samudrayana (ocean voyage) is forbidden in the Shastras, but it may not be binding on current followers -- instead they may go through ritual purification after travel. The relevant passage is below: The Baudhayana Sutra, one of the Hindu Dharma Shastras, says that "making voyages ...


13

As answered in comments, the authorities were afraid of their populations defecting en masse (as indeed happened when the borders were thrown open in the GDR and Hungary in the early 1990s, so their fears weren't unfounded) Yes, to a degree. Travel wasn't as easy by far as it was in the west, but it was possible. Yes, some. But those were mostly related to ...


13

Yes. The most famous example is an embassy to Rome sent by several Christian daimyo from Western Japan. Consisting of four teenage envoys and a number of attach├ęs, the group departed from Nagasaki on 20 February 1582 and reached Lisbon on 10 August 1584. In addition to meeting Pope Gregory XIII, the Japanese toured Spain and visited several Northern Italian ...


13

There were assorted royal barges. There are precendents for very large galleys. There were some cruises carrying pilgrims in the middle ages. The nature of the passengers might make this the closest to a cruise liner.


13

There appear to be two candidates which can definitely be considered for oldest road tunnel in the world, and a couple of others which are older but may be disputed. Roughly in chronological order, they are as follows: 1. The Euphrates Tunnel (circa. 2180 to 2160 BC, a little less than 1 km long). This has the most dubious claim as it was probably a ...


12

Yes, your suspicion is correct. Once man had boats (no later than 40,000 years ago) and the ability to live in the arctic, the island chains strung across the Bering Straight could not have been a significant barrier. There are native peoples who traverse it regularly today using native methods. As for evidence, archeologically we know about the Thule ...


12

In "Gulag Archipelago," Alexander Solzhenitsyn made the point that the Soviet Union tried to attract its "citizens" living in Europe to return to the Soviet Union by playing on their homesickness. Once returned, they were imprisoned in Siberia to prevent them from "contaminating" ordinary Russians (by telling stories of a better life abroad). More to the ...


11

Using ORBIS which reconstructs travel through the Roman Empire circa 200CE as a basis, a fast carriage across ~700kms (I chose Naples to Verona) would have taken about 10 days. A horse relay team between the same cities only took 3.6 days to cover 763 kms. One could use these numbers as a rule of thumb for all pre-industrial travel on decent roads. That ...


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