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1

A point* here is that the map represents a snapshot in time, the red areas being CURRENT speakers of Athabaskan-family languages. As such, it quite possibly gives a misleading impression of the Navajo & Mexica having made a great epic migration to the south. There is an alternative explanation that seems at least equally plausible to me. That is that ...


-3

Some people are nomads and hence they migrate naturally. For example, the travellers or Romani originated from India and they travelled through Egypt - hence their colloquial name, (e)gypsies to Europe. That's some epic migration. Quite a number of them keep to this lifestyle, though I suspect that the numbers adhering to this lifestyle in Europe have ...


2

You might want to look into the migration of (Germanic-speaking) Vandals and Suebi and (Iranic-speaking) Alans from Central Europe to Spain and then on to Carthago. Or the migrations of the Kalmyks to Kalmykia and then (in part) back to what is now NW China. In both of these cases people started migrating because their original location became too ...


3

The answer lies in the 1000s of years of "keeping going" and the distance every generation of males moves. If you suppose a "generation" takes about 20 years, each son moves 20 miles away from his family to have his own plot of land and/or find new sources of plants and animals, then in 1000 years, you have 50 generations x 20 miles = ...


0

To support the answer by @Joshua, Wikipedia says: Beersheba is mainly dealt with in the Hebrew Bible in connection with the Patriarchs Abraham and Isaac, who both dig a well and close peace treaties with King Abimelech of Gerar at the site. Hence it receives its name twice, first after Abraham's dealings with Abimelech (Genesis 21:22-34), and again from ...


1

I read in Genesis of the naming of the place of Beersheba, where it mentions not a town but only the wells Abraham had dug. We can suggest a nearby town is present because Abimelech does not appear to be a nomad. (Incidentally we do not and cannot know if the wells there today are the same wells or not.) But by the time of the judge Sameul it is recorded ...


3

In addition to the excellent answers by Fred and Lucian, you also need to consider the economic situation at the time and the existing transport infrastructure. The Industrial Revolution in the UK is generally regarded as beginning in the mid-eighteenth century. By then there was already a transport system that provided for the needs of the country. In ...


7

The steam engine was invented around the start of the 1700s Thomas Newcomen's 1712 atmospheric engine — itself an improvement on Thomas Savery's 1698 steam powered pump, known for being prone to explosions — still presented one major disadvantage: 80% of the steam used by the engine was wasted which was only solved by James Watt's critical addition of a ...


5

As the adage goes, necessity is the mother of invention. If there isn't a perceived idea, it doesn't get invented. Things get designed to solve a particular problem. There is also the issue of the state of technology at a given time. The first issue, was the earlier steam engines were not particularly powerful, so steam engines had to evolve before they ...


2

That's because you look at the problem the other way around. You are accustomed that technology develops lightning fast. In 2000 very few people had internet access, and a lot of business was done without computers. Now, a mere 20 years later, in 2021 everybody has internet access and business cannot be done without computers. (This varies per country, of ...


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