38

It's a pounce pot, being used to dry the wet ink without having to blot it. As noted here, the pounce itself could be made from any of powdered gum sandarac; crushed pumice (origin of pounce I believe), cuttlefish bone, or eggshell; or allum mixed with resin. This was used both to size the writing surface as well as to dry the ink after writing, and the ...


34

I can't find any academic source to support the story. Given the logistics involved, I reckon the amateur historians have it right. It's probably just one more of the stories concocted to make historic buildings more "interesting". To quote Greg Jenner (Chief History "Nerd" on BBC's Horrible Histories) on Twitter Haha thanks, it's one of those half ...


18

Short Answer The second one. Long Answer Many historians believe that at the very beginning King Henry VIII was driven more by personal reasons than theological reasons. Quite a lot of good sources are cited in this wikipedia article and this one. It all started with Henry's troubles with Queen Catherine --his first wife. Henry was obsessed with a male ...


10

England at the time had a fairly widespread system of parish registers, which recorded the christenings, marriages and burials of many people, although it was a bit patchy at first. You can search a good selection of the records at the website www.famlysearch.org. I've just done that and seen that the frequency of first names from births from 1485 to 1603 ...


9

I'm not familiar with the television series you're referring to, but it is generally good advice not to take too much from watching TV. There was plenty of variance in names across the country; plenty of people were called George, William, Robert, Norman, Christopher, Andrew, Luke, John, James, Oliver, Henry etc. However, there was a certain tendency to ...


8

Neither in the Anne Boleyn - Wikipedia account or any other account that I have read has contained the name of the executioner. William Kingston, the Constable of the Tower, in his writings didn't use the name of the executioner. Henry commuted Anne's sentence from burning to beheading, and rather than have a queen beheaded with the common axe, he ...


8

Ann Boleyn and her brother, George, were executed in 1536. It appears that her family had taken a great interest in the early writings of Martin Luther, some of which he translated. Though there were a number of protestant sects by 1530, the reform movement of John Calvin was not yet in existence, nor were Anglicans, Presbyterians, or most other modern ...


8

Perhaps surprisingly, this episode may actually be based events that are reported to have occurred in 1531. In The life of Anne Boleyn by Philip W Sergeant, published in 1923, we read that: Writing to the French ambassador in Rome, a correspondent tells him that (apparently in September) a mob of seven to eight thousand of the women of London, with a ...


6

Henry Fitzroy is the only recognized illegitimate child recognized by Henry VIII. Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset (15 June 1519 – 23 July 1536), was the son of King Henry VIII of England and his mistress, Elizabeth Blount, and the only illegitimate offspring whom Henry VIII acknowledged. Other children who were suspected as being ...


5

The question breaks down into two parts: Why a swordsman instead of an axeman, and why the swordsman of Calais. I now believe that the answer I posted earlier was only partially correct. This source offers a more likely answer, that "Henry did not care about Anne's feelings," and that he chose the sword as "the symbol of Camelot, of a rightful king." On ...


4

For many, 22 August 1485 remains one of the key dates in British history. Yet what exactly took place in the early hours of the morning (the battle was over by noon) still remains tantalisingly elusive. BBC Extra


4

Suggest you start here: P.W. FLEMING, Household Servants of the Yorkist and Early Tudor Gentry, in: Daniel WILLIAMS (ed.), Early Tudor England (Harlaxton Medieval Studies, O.S., 4), Woodbridge 1989, pp. 19-36


4

Probably not. I'm unaware of any serious historical speculation (or more importantly evidence) along those lines. At the time having the King's babies was essentially a queen's one and only job. This went double for King Henry, as he had already executed one previous wife essentially for not producing male heirs. Its possible of course. While not as ...


4

I'm not sure if an answer from the community is forthcoming, so I'll take a stab at an answer based on newly-read information including comments to my original post. This answer comes comes with the caveat it's pieced together by me - a non-expert in this milieu of history - from only recently-read articles and a little reading between the lines. It is the ...


2

Question: Why didn't Anne Boleyn consent to divorce? King Henry didn't require Anne Boleyn's consent for divorce. Katherine of Aragon, Henry's first wife, never consented to divorce. Law at the time, was an engine of state, not a mechanism for justice. Henry was the state. Anne Boleyn never had the opportunity to seek divorce because the window ...


2

It's possible. The princes were a significant roadblock to Henry's ascension to the throne. Even though Richard III had the princes declared illegitimate in 1484 by way of a Titulus Regius, Henry's claim to the throne was tenuous at best (some 20+ ahead of him in succession). He needed to marry into the royal family and re-legitimise Elizabeth of York by ...


1

I live in Belgium, the former Low countries! In my regions it was normal if you were from high birth that the decapitation was done by the sword without discussion, and if you were of lower birth than they performed it with an axe! I am surprised to read that this rule didn't stand in England and that for high birth it was normal to use an axe?


1

At least one modern authority, historian Alison Weir, believes that Catherine Howard used birth control (her book, King Henry VIII, p. 446). What form that might be is hard to say, probably some "barrier" method such as a crude diaphragm, or maybe IUD. This would be during her "relationship" with Francis Derehem, which she did not consider a "real" ...


1

William Stanley did not support Warbeck. In fact, he helped put the king on the throne and strongly supported him. Henry had Stanley set up by being falsely accused by a stool pigeon named Robert Clifford who was put up to it by Henry's men. Henry disliked that Stanley was very popular with everyone, and moreover he looked forward to seizing Stanley's ...


1

I have upvoted Monster Truck's answer, but would like to add a bit more. It wasn't just Henry that wanted away from Rome. Thomas Cromwell was not just a lawyer, he was Henry's chief minister and a rabid Protestant. In fact, many in the rising middle class, and many newly prominent nobles, wanted the dissolution from Rome, so in addition to his personal ...


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