11

The "Moors" were a very diverse group. The first invading "Moors" were Arabs and Berbers from North Africa, the Berbers being descended from the Moors of Classical antiquity and thus probably mostly looking like other Mediterranean people. A lot of native Spaniards converted to Islam over the centuries, and so a lot of "Moors" looked like native Spaniards ...


9

Consider this doctoral dissertation: The hammer and the crescent: Contacts between Andalusi Muslims, Franks, and their successors in three waves of Muslim expansion into Francia, available at https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9112639/ It is based on an analysis of the original source material. You can preview the introductory chapter for free.


4

I am no expert on the topic, but I know Arabic and I have access to sources in Arabic (but disclaimer, I am a Sunni Muslim, so my sources are "Wahhabist" sources, and I do not agree with that misleading term "Wahhabism", but just you would understand). From Al Alukah Website, an author called Shareef AbdulAziz Al-Zuhairi wrote: "The Sad Ending: The new ...


3

I believe it was the exotic nature they were going for. Moor came to equate with foreign and negroid people were the most foreign looking at the time. There is also St Maurice who was depicted as Negroid from at least the 13th century. His depiction varies from Roman soldier to negro dressed as a knight. While the original St Maurice came from Thebes, Egypt,...


1

The key is the theoretical term "Imaginary." The imaginary is a post-structuralist influenced term which claims that cultures have, effectively, a collective subconscious. As you note the "imaginary" of the Muslim from North Africa stabilised on a black or dark depiction long before the triangle trade reformed Western European racism on an economic basis. ...


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