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66

These are jodhpurs, a style of pants developed primarily for horseback riding. Their intent was to allow flexibility in the hip and thigh while the more narrow lower portion worked well with riding boots and didn't get caught up in stirrups.


38

They were not supermen by any means :) But yes, temperatures were higher, by more than 1 degree (Kent and Wales were famous for their wines, right now it's far too cold there for that for example). And don't forget that in the Roman era, wars were fought in summer almost exclusively, later expanding into spring and autumn as the conscript army was replaced ...


30

The skull and crossbones or "death's head" is not a purely German - still less a specifically Nazi - symbol, but has been, and still is, used by many military units, including the British, Australian and Swedish armies and the US Marine Corps. The British Queen's Royal Lancers use the skull and crossbones with the caption beneath "Or Glory" - the "Death or ...


25

The deaths head (Totenkopf) is a symbol that had been in use by many German and Prussian military units in history, going back hundreds of years. It was mainly to signify their high levels of badassery. The SS picked up on this and used it themselves to co-opt that history to mold themselves as an elite force. Use of the symbol as a military insignia ...


23

Helmet spikes and flanges were originally intended to deflect saber blows. Those on the Pickelhaube are somewhat stylized, but they still served the original purpose. Source: German Wikipedia. I thought I remembered something similar from the English Civil War, but a bit of googling got me nothing.


23

These boots are in the calceus style. As such they are quite spot on and accurate for a Roman soldier in colder climates. But not unlike the caligae we stereotypically associate with a legionaire's outfit these type of footwear were also found across the entire empire. via an ugly site The actual styles came in quite a variety, though: "Replikat ...


22

Yes, these are authentic cadette uniforms. But note that 1 is "standard", while 2 and 3 are "parade" variants. No 1. is a kind of standard infantry uniform which had a little changes from WW1 to WW2. The most controversial part is, probably, a side cap, as you see it usually only in WW2 chronicles. It was adopted as a part of Red Army infantry uniform only ...


21

The Colonel was of Scottish descent and served with the King's Own Scottish Borderers in WW I (according to Wikipedia). The trouser pattern in question could well exhibit the unit's (mainly green-and-blue) tartan. Also, the cape he wears appears very similar to those exhibited at the King's Own Scottish Borderers Regimental Museum's web site. And as for him ...


18

This is a French soldier from the 13th Batallion Chasseurs Alpins. They are light infantry mountain troops.


17

I agree with the comments, it doesn't look military in nature. Looking at various organization, I finally found an item listed on ebay which seems to match both the wide emblem and the tasseled 8-point star with cross inset. I've zoomed in on part of the image showing the large emblem on the sash, revealing the motto Amicitia Amor et Veritas or in English: "...


13

The long strap you are referring to is called a "Guige" strap, and the original intention was likely not to allow the shield to be transported on one's back (although it would have been an added bonus) - the primary purpose was likely to distribute the weight of the shield during use. Given that a shield could weigh upwards of 5-10kg, being able to support ...


13

This is a Private of the 13th Regiment of Foot (1st Somersetshire) after 1881. He is a qualified marksman with two Good Conduct stripes and has been in the service for at least six years. The logo on the helmet and lapel does look an awful lot like a rather blurry Somerset Light Infantry badge known at various times as the 13th Regiment of Foot, 1st ...


12

http://www.romanarmy.net/coldweather.htm Seems to address cold weather clothing very well. It seems they did what we did, scarfs, multiple layers, hats, enclosed boots etc but with the exception of trousers, which they saw as barbarian. They went for lower leg coverings instead. I would point out these guys seem to manage without trousers. Except actually ...


12

Growing up I heard it was so if need be you could swing them as a weapon at the end of the belt. The idea that this was done deliberately, by the manufacturer, so the buckle could be used as an improvised weapon seems a bit absurd once you look into it. Since the belt went outside a soldier's jacket, I guess the idea is they'll ride around swinging it like ...


12

Seems as if the Copricapo head gear gives it away: black capercaillie feathers flowing from their wide-brimmed black hats. These feathers are also worn on Bersaglieri combat helmets. They once served a military purpose, acting as camouflage and as a sunshade for the marksman's shooting eye. But note that Italian Wikipedia firmly contradicts the species ...


11

It is called a gorget. In certain military traditions it served as a mark of leadership. I cannot cite my source, but I recall reading a speculation that it may have evolved from the full cuirass that was worn by knights in antiquity. With the advent of gunpowder, such body armor was no longer of practical use, but the gorget served as a reminder of the old ...


11

I'm fairly sure it's an imitation uniform of the character Captain Mainwaring from an old British comedy series named Dad's Army. It originally ran from the late 60s till the late 70s and was very popular. As PewDiePie is from Sweden it wouldn't be too surprising that he would know of this as it is considered a classic British comedy TV series. https://www....


11

It looks, with the tapering frogging connecting at the single, center row of buttons, you may have a Royal Horse Artillery uniform. Some better images can be seem on a forum here. Another forum has this image. (note similar positioning of the aiguillette). (Note the feature I identified as an aiguillette may also be described in this case as a busby line, ...


10

Actually, streltsy worn two types of kaftans – basic kaftan and kaftan for cold weather. Cold weather kaftan is quilted with sheepskin or fur and has fur collar and fur hem sleeves. Basic kaftan: Winter kaftan (note sleeves and collar): According to Yuri Veremeev, "Anatomy of Army"


9

Wikipedia to the rescue: This article on caligae (military boots) states that Socks were not normally worn with caligae, although in colder climates such as Britain, woolen socks were used. This one on Roman military personal equipment mentions that [The sagum and the paenula] were made from wool, which insulated and also contained natural oil to ...


9

My father fought on the German side on the Western Front in the First World War, as a very young man. I remember him telling me that the great advantage of high boots without laces was exactly that they could easily be taken off and put on quickly, unlike the low laced boots and puttees worn by British soldiers. He said as a result that "trench foot" was ...


9

It's not specifically any uniform. Probably just something he picked up in a costume or surplus store. So the officers cap is a Service Dress Cap of the British Army style. However that horse pin/insignia on the front is meaningless, the symbol might be used in some militaries but the pin it self is obviously too plain/cheap to be part of any officer's ...


9

Looks like your soldier may be a member of the 56th Regiment New York Volunteers, also known as the 10th Legion (hence the patch). You can see a couple of soldiers with similar uniforms at a site here and here:


9

Looks like it may match Felsted Schools symbol. Wikipedia entry here. There seems to be indications of earlier Felsted schools which did have women or girls in attendance. Felsted house had a practising School which had 90 girls attending. Practising Schools Two immediately opposite the college One for 90 girls and one for 120 infants Both reported ...


8

George Washington made a point of NOT wearing a military uniform in civilian life. In his First Inaugural speech, he pointedly wore a "cloth coat" to set an example for other citizens of the fledgling Republic. Source http://suite101.com/article/washingtons-american-made-inaugural-clothes-a213962


8

Yes. Quoting Wikipedia: Im Dritten Reich war "Goldfasan" ein vom Volksmund geprägter Begriff für hohe Parteifunktionäre und Militärs im Hinblick auf ihre Uniformen und den Ordensschmuck darauf, allen voran Hermann Göring, der im gleichen Wortsinn auch "Lametta-Heini" genannt wurde. Der tierische Ausdruck geht dabei beispielhaft konform mit dem der "hohen ...


8

I agree that this jacket is not a military uniform. In fact it appears to be a very strange copy of the original painting, in which the buttons were completely different, and the coat was actually black(ish). This is similar to the painting of Adam Winne , painted by Peter Vanderlyn, 1730, but with quite a few differences. The painting is discussed at ...


8

It's not Masonic - it's the U.S. Army Marksman Button from the 1880's. FYI: Most Masonic Jewelry will feature one or more of: a carpenter's square; compasses/dividers; and the letter 'G'. However jewelry for associated organization such as Shriners, York Rite and Scottish Rite will employ additional symbolism.


7

That's not the winter uniform, it's simply the uniform, and was worn in all weathers. In Russia in the early 17th century, strel’tsy (semiprofessional musketeers) wore red caftans (coats) with a white sash. In the second half of the 17th century, they wore fur-trimmed caftans of various colors, cloth caps, and colored high boots. ... Working ...


7

Not all Scots ran around in kilts - that is very much a Highland tradition. The KOSB being borderers and lowlanders in general did not see the kilt as part of their own tradition, and thus Tartan Trews were worn - and looked very sharp if I may say so. The pipers of the regiment did wear the Royal Stewart in a Kilt, bit other ranks wore Leslie Tartan Trews ...


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