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8

The kindly Deputy Head of Collections at Manchester Museum took a look at my stone and gave the following response. Your 'bead' is almost certainly a fossil called porosphaera globularis. There has been some discussion as to whether they were used as beads in prehistoric times, several hundred thousand years ago. Fossils re-used in this way often have ...


4

I think that the interpretation of the statement as extremely aristocratic lords looking down upon Queen Victoria and the royal family as persons of lower status is rather unlikely to be the correct one. Instead such statements more probably refer to her ability to keep in touch with the opinions of the middle class. Many of the noble titles in England go ...


30

This has been quoted a few times, in slight variation, like here, with attribution indeed to Disraeli: — Harry Blamires: "The Victorian Age of Literature", Longman literature guides, Longman, 1988. p10 (gBooks) And used here as well: He [Prince Albert] never became really popular with the aristocracy or the working man, but it was otherwise with ...


3

A Google search for both Wakefields side by side reveals less than a hundred results, none of them even remotely relevant; and when the two names do indeed appear together, it is another Mary Wakefield altogether; this would appear highly unlikely, were the two Wakefields to have indeed been related. Mary Wakefield has two brothers; Maximilian Wakefield (...


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