21

From what I can see, the term "The Good War" when used for WWII was coined by Studs Terkel. If you look at the Google ngrams as Mark C Wallace suggests, you see two spikes, one small one starting in late sixties, and one large one starting in the late eighties. In 1965, Marian Maury published The good war: The UN's world-wide fight against poverty,...


15

There is a Wikipedia article for the word Negro, which may shed some light on the issue. Within that article is a section on the history of the use of the word in the US. It appears the usage by MLK is at the end of the time period where the word Negro was more accepted (emphasis mine): "Negro" was accepted as normal, both as exonym and endonym, ...


15

This is probably in reference to several major US municipalities that banned pinball in the mid 20th century. Often this was because gambling machines were starting to disguise themselves as pinball machines to skirt around anti-gambling laws. However, in at least one case in New York City, pinball itself was purposely banned for about 30 years, because ...


8

Yes, the islands themselves had a macro-economy, where each had their own specialties that the contributed to the inter-island economy. Soon, entire islands began to specialize in certain skilled trades. Oʻahu became the chief kapa (tapa bark cloth) manufacturer. Maui became the chief canoe manufacturer. The island of Hawaiʻi exchanged bales of dried fish. ...


7

John Pickering's A vocabulary, or collection of words and phrases which have been supposed to be peculiar to the United States of America of 1816, does not use the phrase "American English"; but he refers (p.10) to "a language, that is to be called at some future day the American tongue!". This latter is contained in "An Essay on the ...


7

It has been claimed that the parish of an Englishman's birth can be identified from hearing him speak a few sentences. Likewise in Modern America the accents and usages of Boston, New York, Charlottesville, Chicago, Dallas, and Los Angeles are today, and always have been, very different. Despite these disparities, there is no such animal as "American ...


4

Few languages are created by a dictionary writer.* The differences emerging between 'English English' and 'American English' were observable a lot earlier than the very desire for American Independence from Britain came into being, let alone to fruition We therefore need to go further back than the publication of that dictionary. A certain Mr Webster just ...


2

From a recent book of his letters, one Noel Willmett, who had asked (Orwell) “whether totalitarianism, leader-worship etc. are really on the up-grade” given “that they are not apparently growing in [England] and the USA”. This was his reply: I must say I believe, or fear, that taking the world as a whole these things are on the increase. Hitler, no doubt, ...


2

To separate people cleanly into "racist" and "non-racist" does not reflect reality, and certainly doesn't reflect the reality of JFK or LBJ. They both did a lot of good towards racial justice, but they certainly were both racist in their own ways. But if you want an example that educated white people with strong anti-racist reputations ...


1

Sum it up "Negro" was the word. Before the 1920's it was "Colored" W.E.B. Du Bois, along with Booker T. Washington advocated for replacing with "Negro" After the 1920's. In the 80's after the black power movement faded, many of it's leaders decided another semantic change was required. Jesse Jackson led the push toward African-...


1

My fifteen cents to black history: Rome: Septimius_Severus - the first black Roman Emperor. Pescennius_Niger - another one maybe more... Egypt: There are bunch of theories, who was this peoples, however, we have many statues: You could read this page of wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pharaohs


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