48

Looking at driver's licenses held by women and considering that manufacturers were aiming certain car models specifically at women, female drivers were not uncommon or unusual in the US in the 1950s and 1960s, or even before that. As you allude to in your question, this is in marked contrast to the UK. In the 1950s in the US, about half of adult women had a ...


16

It's because going up the Arkansas river is steeper than going up the Verdigris River. Tulsa has an elevation of 722 ft above sea level, vs 623 ft for Catoosa. For technical and engineering reasons, Catoosa was the more economical terminus. Originally, the Arkansas River was not naturally suited for navigation, at least not year round. The Army Corps of ...


14

The description reads as authentic. Of course, we need to differentiate quite a bit. The more rural it gets the earlier female adoption of driving automobiles is observed. It seems that by 1940 most young and middle–aged farm women who were interested in mobility could and did drive the family car. — Margaret Walsh: "Gender and the Automobile in the ...


8

Yes, at least in non-urban areas. Certainly among high school aged women (because I'm going from personal experience). Basically everyone drove as soon as they legally could (sometimes sooner :-)). Those with enough money would have their own cars, otherwise they'd use the family car. One thing that might give something of a wrong impression is that when ...


6

My mother (born 1936) certainly drove in the 50's and 60's. Until the mid-70's my parents had only one car, and she was the primary driver (my father could take the train to his work while she had to drive). My mother-in-law drove across the country in 1967 with her three children in a station wagon pulling an Airstream trailer, taking them to meet with my ...


5

As I remember, my family had one car at a time during the 1950s and 1960s. My mother drove the car, as my father never learned how to drive. I don't remember when my bothers and sisters learned to drive but all except me learned to drive before 1980, and my sisters were married and one of my brothers living eleswhere, by then. One of my grandmothers drove ...


3

Most young women drove, by young I mean under 50. Many did not have cars because of cost so may not have routinely driven. In those days reliability of most cars was crap and if you did not do your own work, it was very expensive. Although low income/ in college, I normally had two cars from about 58'. Then when one did not run , I used the other until I ...


2

Most of experienced Japanese troops, that had been used to do the bright land conquests of 1942, were destroyed in shipping in South Pacific (5th division) or were stuck in the battle of Burma until destruction by combined British, American and Chinese forces. However, a lot of Japanese troops stayed in China for most of the war, even if they were mostly ...


1

There is a bad history of forced sterilization in Puerto Rico. That's because it was a U.S. possession on which the majority of people did not speak English, and on which there was a fear of overpopulation. U.S. states with large Hispanic populations, notably California, also "encouraged" Hispanic women to be sterilized. This source claims that the ...


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