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2

To separate people cleanly into "racist" and "non-racist" does not reflect reality, and certainly doesn't reflect the reality of JFK or LBJ. They both did a lot of good towards racial justice, but they certainly were both racist in their own ways. But if you want an example that educated white people with strong anti-racist reputations ...


1

Sum it up "Negro" was the word. Before the 1920's it was "Colored" W.E.B. Du Bois, along with Booker T. Washington advocated for replacing with "Negro" After the 1920's. In the 80's after the black power movement faded, many of it's leaders decided another semantic change was required. Jesse Jackson led the push toward African-...


15

This is probably in reference to several major US municipalities that banned pinball in the mid 20th century. Often this was because gambling machines were starting to disguise themselves as pinball machines to skirt around anti-gambling laws. However, in at least one case in New York City, pinball itself was purposely banned for about 30 years, because ...


0

Because of the palmate antlers, this looks more like is called a moose rather than what is called an elk, in the U.S. There is a fraternal organization called the Loyal Order of the Moose that was founded in 1888 in Louisville, Kentucky, but now exists all across the U.S. as well as in some Canadian provinces and parts of Great Britain. There is/was a ...


15

There is a Wikipedia article for the word Negro, which may shed some light on the issue. Within that article is a section on the history of the use of the word in the US. It appears the usage by MLK is at the end of the time period where the word Negro was more accepted (emphasis mine): "Negro" was accepted as normal, both as exonym and endonym, ...


0

One of them is US Marshall Herschel Garner of Rison, AR. He was present in New Orleans with several school integrations during this time.


2

From a recent book of his letters, one Noel Willmett, who had asked (Orwell) “whether totalitarianism, leader-worship etc. are really on the up-grade” given “that they are not apparently growing in [England] and the USA”. This was his reply: I must say I believe, or fear, that taking the world as a whole these things are on the increase. Hitler, no doubt, ...


8

Yes, the islands themselves had a macro-economy, where each had their own specialties that the contributed to the inter-island economy. Soon, entire islands began to specialize in certain skilled trades. Oʻahu became the chief kapa (tapa bark cloth) manufacturer. Maui became the chief canoe manufacturer. The island of Hawaiʻi exchanged bales of dried fish. ...


21

From what I can see, the term "The Good War" when used for WWII was coined by Studs Terkel. If you look at the Google ngrams as Mark C Wallace suggests, you see two spikes, one small one starting in late sixties, and one large one starting in the late eighties. In 1965, Marian Maury published The good war: The UN's world-wide fight against poverty,...


1

My fifteen cents to black history: Rome: Septimius_Severus - the first black Roman Emperor. Pescennius_Niger - another one maybe more... Egypt: There are bunch of theories, who was this peoples, however, we have many statues: You could read this page of wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pharaohs


0

I think it was the abbreviation for drayer and meant the commercial provider of goods or services in the second half of the 19th century .


2

The reason was best described in 1835 by one Alexis de Tocqueville in "Democracy in America." "There are at the present time two great nations in the world, which started from different points, but seem to tend towards the same end. I allude to the Russians and the Americans... All other nations seem to have nearly reached their natural ...


4

In the early 20th century, China was more to be pitied, than feared. The anti-Chinese sentiments in California were directed against individual people, not the whole country. It arose against the Japanese as well, with the important difference that the hostility was also against Japan as a country. Japan also posed a challenge to the United States where it ...


3

The other answers have mentioned a lot of other people and events that your school should have told you about. I'm going to tackle this from a slightly different angle, and try to explain why you're experiencing this problem - and you are definitely not imagining it. You summarised the curriculum as segregation, slavery and 3 civil rights icons. Believe it ...


2

This grievance refers to the Proclamation of 1763; and the refusal of the British Parliament and King to reverse or modify it. And We do further declare it to be Our Royal Will and Pleasure, for the present as aforesaid, to reserve under our Sovereignty, Protection, and Dominion, for the use of the said Indians, all the Lands and Territories not included ...


16

I wonder if it might not be useful to collate a set of links that could be provided to augment the school's curriculum. Significant individuals in Black history 18th Century and before Crispus Attucks and other African American notables from the Revolution Billy Lee - George Washington's valet. Arguably not the most significant individual in history, but ...


2

The most recent sitting VP not nominated while running for President was Alben Barkley, Truman's VP. He was passed over for a younger man (Adlai Stevenson) in 1952. Also Thomas R. Marshall, Wilson's VP (1920). In the 19th century, the Vice Presidency was considered as spot for "has-beens and never-wases".


1

Good question and it is regrettable that you have good cause to feel that way. First, you're probably right, you are going to hear about those 3 or 4 people for a while. A big part of it is that, historically, the US, like most Western countries (and currently possibly quite a bit less than some) was run by white people. So, going in back in history, there ...


4

Black history, sometimes known as "African Studies" or "Africana," has at least two distinct elements. An example comes from the course catalog of the University of Pitsburgh, the city where I grew up. The first, and more common, element is close to what you said. That is, African-American history, which consists largely of America's ...


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