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One of the catalysts was the "accidental" sinking of the U.S.S. Panay in December, 1937. This was an American-owned and flagged gunboat patrolling the Yangtze River. The Japanese didn't realize this (or so they claimed) because it was of Chinese make, and Japan was at war with China. The incident was contained but not forgotten when the Japanese ...


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In a word, globalization. Since the colonization of North America, and even before the inception of the "United States," labor has been the scarce factor of production, compared to land, or even "capital." So labor has always been highly compensated in the United States, compared to foreign countries. That's why the United States has had ...


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South Carolina was the first state (after Vermont) to allow universal white male suffrage in 1810. The 1807 NJ voter restriction still required white men to be worth 50 pounds proclamation money. amrevmuseum.org


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Not so much no. While its a common belief that this was an Oklahoma phenomena*, and the two states do nearly border, the serious issues with wind erosion and the associated dust storms were actually largely in an 6-state area centered on the panhandle in far western Oklahoma. In fact, Nebraska had bigger issues with dust storm erosion during that period than ...


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According to the great dust bowl of the 1930s was a policy made disaster: During the same April as Black Sunday, 1935, one of FDR's advisors, Hugh Hammond Bennett, was in Washington, DC, on his way to testify before Congress about the need for soil conservation legislation. A dust storm arrived in Washington all the way from the Great Plains. As a dusty ...


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Here are some rough economic facts for a start. The North had four times the GDP of the South. The North had 22 million people. The South had 9.5 million people, of which just under 4.0 million were slaves, so 5.5 million white people. If you divide the white populations, you get a four to one North/South ratio, the same as the GDP ratio. This means that the ...


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Guarding the Gates There is a book about it called Guarding the Gates. Henry Pratt Fairchild & The Press According to sociologist Henry Pratt Fairchild in Page 82 of Guarding the Gates the Greeks and Italians were disproportionately "criminal types" unable to assimilate in to society. According to Page 82 the press were equally scathing, ...


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The linked Smithsonian page also has this page from a report, which expresses it a bit more explictly: ...completed an earthbound journey of nearly 14,000 miles by land, visiting the capitals of the 48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia. The mobile display completed the tour travelling 12,000 miles by sea, for visits to Honolulu in April, 1971, ...


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A different question but related Slavery economically advantageous? If cotton is taken to be a significant driver of the practice of slavery it can be argued that slavery was not in decline leading up to the Civil War. Cotton exports summary: 1820 America Exported 250,000 bales worth $22 million 1840 America Exported 1.5 million bales worth $64 million ...


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As noted in my book, the Gazette article containing the Washington petition, including the expression regarding property and proportion, was enclosed in a letter from John Neville to George Clymer that is now in the Wolcott Papers of the Connecticut Historical Society, or was in 2003 or '04, when I did research there. Furhermore, here's the relevant ...


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Slaves were considered a capital asset not just labor. By 1861 almost half the total value of the South's capital assets was in the "value of negroes". They were taxable wealth. When slaves were freed the slave owners lost over $2 billion in capital. Most agricultural societies the most valuable asset is land, in the South it was slaves. They ...


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The proportion of property I assume is a summarization by the author to represent the six to 18-cent per gallon tax rate that targeted smaller producers, which is explained in further detail below. Unlike tariffs paid on goods imported into the United States, the excise tax on distilled spirits was a direct tax on Americans who produced whiskey and other ...


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It would be nice to get a link to the full statement (anyone?), but it sounds like it is saying that it was what we'd today call a regressive tax: A tax that hits the poor much harder than the rich. Technically, I believe it was a flat tax. However, alcohol taxes today are often considered regressive, and some of the reasons for that likely applied in the ...


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US Navy purchased 16 norwegian-built Tjeld-class fast patrol boats in the 1960's (called "Nasty-class" in the US), followed by additional 6 vessels built under licence in the US. Nasty-Class patrol boats


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Society was very different between the USA and the UK at that time, and might account for why your observations are so different from what you saw on American TV. My parents for instance emigrated from the UK in 1957. They were about 30 years old, but neither of them had ever driven a car. Public transit was excellent in the UK so there was no real need for ...


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