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94

Strange at it may seem, there was a movement called "anti-suffragism" in the U.S. and U.K. composed mainly of women. Their numbers were small, since this posture would have been "counterintuitive." The Americans were composed mainly of "conservative" women who liked the division of duties and society between "domestic" (for women), and "outside," for men. ...


85

Yes, there were. And at the beginning of the women's suffrage movement, suffragettes were viewed by most women as oddities rather than heroic liberators. Basically, centuries ago, due to the technological and economical environment, the family as a unit was much more important than how many people view it today. It was close to impossible to survive (and ...


73

You're not the first person to ask this question. It's obviously not possible to know exactly how any election would have gone in things were different, but we have enough demographic polling data to make educated guesses. FiveThirtyEight has done extensive analyses on what voting maps would look like if only specific demographics voted. In this most ...


70

I find this an unsatisfactory answer but perhaps it will provoke someone to make a better one along similar lines. In the 2012 US presidential election, men voted (according to exit polls) 52:45 in favour of Romney over Obama, compared with the overall result of 51:47 in favour of Obama. So if we assume the exit polls give a perfectly accurate indication of ...


30

Not only were there women who opposed suffrage, there still are. For instance, here's Central Missisippi Tea Party President Janis Lane in 2012: I'm really going to set you back here. Probably the biggest turn we ever made was when the women got the right to vote. [...] Our country might have been better off if it was still just men voting. There is ...


27

A Spanish example: Victoria Kent. Quote from the link: Kent was against giving women the right to vote immediately, arguing that, as Spanish women lacked at that moment social and political education enough to vote responsibly, they would be very much influenced by the Catholic priests, damaging left wing parties.


26

In the 1933 Spanish general election women were enfranchised by the first time, and the right won the election - while in the previous 1931 election the left had won. One of the cited causes of that victory of the right was that women were more influenced by the Church than men, so they tended to follow more their priest's advice and vote for conservative ...


18

First of all, less than 20% of Athenians were citizens, so comparing to the total population voter turnout in the USA may actually be higher. Second, because of the smaller size of Attica as compared to USA the decisions the citizens would vote for had direct consequences to each of them. Third, the voting class was also the class with most citizenship ...


15

Michael's answer is a very good one but I'd like to add a couple of details. First, Athenian citizens were not always as enthusiastic about voting as you'd think: voting required a whole day which meant they'd be missing out on one day of revenue from labor. To compensate for this, Athenians were paid (type f3 and search for paid) about as much as the daily ...


13

In Switzerland, it had to pass a popular referendum. (Switzerland also joined the UN and legalized abortion only in 2002 — both decisions that were passed through referendum.) Similarly in Liechtenstein, 1984, where the 4th referendum in 16 years only narrowly passed despite support from newspapers and both major political parties. Passing a popular ...


11

So a decade and a half ago, here in Kansas, we had a Senator named Kay O'Connor, a woman, who opposed women's right to vote. You can find all sorts of quotes from this individual around the internet, but this article sums it up pretty well. Relevant quotes from the article: "Sen. Kay O'Connor recently told the co-presidents of the Johnson County League ...


9

Voting(at least in the US) was originally designed to revolve around land owner(freeholder) families. So the intention was that someone who was pulled together enough(paid taxes-as there was no income tax, had a legitimate interest in the community and most likely wasn't beholden to the very rich) to own property free and clear was the type of person who ...


8

The spoiling of ballots or the casting of blank votes as a protest has not, for the most part, been an effective 'political instrument' of the masses for change. Although the percentage of spoiled or blank ballots has increased over the past 30 years, the numbers have rarely been dramatic. The main exceptions to this are in the Latin American countries of ...


8

The election of the Doge was an incredibly complicated process, refined across the centuries. It seems to have reached more or less its definitive shape around the fourteenth century, although it was tinkered in minor details up to the end of the Republic. What follows is the description of the election procedure in Maranini's La Costituzione di Venezia, vol....


7

Expanding on my two earlier comments, the last archive link you posted offers the explanation on pages 344-345. Loosely summarized: Regnault proposed a motion to introduce the tie breaking mechanism, all while suggesting the original idea stemmed from an earlier speech on the best ballot mode by de Mirabeau. Such a law, continues the explanation, would ...


7

Well the "Reason" to this was the Swiss vote system. To make a change in the Swiss constitution, a "vote initiative" has to be submitted. If the prospective vote initiative fulfills some conditions and other things, it gets to be an initiative. This initiative goes out and then the people which are allow can vote about it. They can accept or decline it. If ...


6

In the US, referendums are handled on a statewide basis. There's no constitutional basis for having a national one. So if you wanted to effect a national referendum, you'd need to get the same referendum put up in all 50 states for the same election. That may sound a bit daunting, but candidates for president (at least in the primaries), have to go through ...


6

Of course there were some women opposed. My mother was one. Her opinion, which I can neither validate nor invalidate, was that women gave up many more intangible rights than they gained in tangible rights. In her view women were the mistress (read "master") of the home prior to the change. Being on "equal footing" with men meant giving up what she perceived ...


6

There's an assumption in your question, that free and democratic voting can't result in very high percentage wins. In addition to whether it's free and fair, it also depends on the voting system and the choices being voted for. There's an important observation in economics known as Hotelling's law that's applicable to political elections. The premise is ...


5

The French presidential election of 1848 will likely catch your interest. This direct popular vote saw Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte win with 74.44% of the votes. (No idea what the turnout was.) He was the first (and only) president of the 2nd French Republic. He was blocked by the Constitution and by the Parliament from running for a second term, so did a coup ...


5

I might suggest the election of Susanna Madora Salter as mayor of Argonia, Kansas, in 1887. From the Kansas Historical Society page on her: First woman mayor in the U.S... Soon after Kansas women gained the right to vote in municipal elections, voters elected (Salter)... (She was) Nominated on the Prohibition Party ticket by several Argonia men ...


5

Here is an example of another very complex appointment process. Angelo N. Ancheta in his paper "Redistricting Reform and the California Citizens Redistricting Commission" described the process of selecting commissioners thus: The selection process for the Commission is also carefully structured to limit partisanship and to check institutional power. The ...


4

Before making statements about the US Constitution, I suggest reading it. The original Constitution said nothing about who does or who does not have the right to vote. Voting standards during the colonial and immediate post-colonial period were the same as those in Britain, which operated on a simple principle: whoever paid taxes was entitled to a single ...


4

There are already several good answers, but it seems that nobody has mentioned the obvious yet: The most famous and most powerful woman in 1895 in UK (and on Earth) was Queen Victoria, aka "Her Majesty Victoria, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith, Empress of India." Her opposition to women's ...


4

Switzerland practices direct democracy and has many votings. There is a list of Swiss federal referendums at wikipedia with the results. The results are listed in the German version. A short translation help of the columns: Beteiligung = voter participation Anteil Ja-Stimmen: Yes-votes. Some results with high yes vote (>80%): 11.03.2012: 87% yes with ...


3

Your goal seems to be to establish good bounds for what a reasonable margin for a "big victory" looks like in a national election for a single leader in a functioning Democracy. Not a lot of Democratic countries actually have direct elections for Head of State. The two most prominent I know of are the USA and France. I know you specified direct election, ...


3

The question sort of implies that voting is a concept so complex that it was invented once, and everyone else borrowed the concept from a predecessor. In fact, tribal societies the world over have long been observed to select leadership and/or decide issues via voting. So this appears to be a fairly natural method of joint decision-making, that certainly ...


3

I believe this question puts the cart before the horse. It is not that (aspects of) Athenian democracy somehow motivated its citizens to great political activity; but that the highly motivated political activity of Athenian citizens created and sustained Athens' democracy. A people always get the government they deserve, and the citizens of ancient ...


3

If you follow democracy a bit, you'll know that there were women like that without requiring explicit proof. There are immigrants who advocate a stronger stance on immigration. There are officers who want to spend less money on the military. There are minimum wage workers who are opposed to a higher minimum wage. I'm wondering if there's a friendly ...


2

A further clarification of the issue would also be to remember that a lot of Athenian citizens actually did not live in the city of Athens itself, but in the smaller cities spread out over Attica. Many of them were situated so far from the city that they did not participate in the day-to-day politics of the state at all. Also, I guess we should ask ...


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