Hot answers tagged

68

FC: What exactly is a 'stimulant'? We might follow some modern definition and arrive at a certain restricted subset of chemicals that includes meth and modafinil. But that excludes quite a bit of drugs used and disregards a lot of effects that derive from synergistic combinations, timing, dosage set and setting of using drugs. The question also leaves open ...


53

No country is impossible to invade. Andorra could invade the USA. The question you should have asked was "Was Switzerland Impossible to Conquer during World War II?". The answer is no country is impossible to conquer. But there is great variation in the probability that a specific country will actually conquer another specific country if it tries to ...


40

Ok, since I think I finally got your real question (as I see it): I'm simply asking if the defense of Switzerland during WW2 was overrated. Many people claim that the country was impossible to occupy, I just want to know if this is not clearly exaggerated. The emphasis is what I interpret as your "real" question (since there is a lot of confusion here) ...


34

Caffeine is a stimulant and it was heavily Used in the US Civil War. At the time, it was believed to “[give] a significant advantage”: Grinspan states that Union General Benjamin Butler was aware of the effect caffeine had on soldiers and ordered his men to carry coffee in their canteens. He planned his attacks, in part, when his men were most ...


25

What factors were Hitler's / Germany's motivations for WW2? Revanchism, stealing raw materials, and racial hatreds. The Swiss are largely German-speaking / Germanic, so there's no "racial superiority" factor to promote invasion and de facto depopulation/extermination and colonization. They don't have a excessive amount of arable land for "true German" ...


21

The Germans were certain they could. For instance, their 1940 plans for Operation Tannenbaum estimated that a force of 300,000 to 500,000 men would have been sufficient. Swiss military leadership also thought that an invasion would have been successful: Their revised military plan for the event of an invasion, the Réduit national, called for a delaying ...


18

KOLA NUTS In sub-Saharan Africa, kola nuts have long been used by soldiers. For example, in the Sudan, Military officials dispensed kola to their soldiers before battle. It was thought to make men brave, even eager for combat (‘Yana sa mutum ya yi yaki da yawa’), and it combated cowardice and the urge to flee on the battlefield because it made men ...


17

Based on the persistent comments by Hans, this new OP seems really keen to get an answer. So I will try. But I have a qualifier, and that is I'm not really that interested in rehashing political debates (which it could turn into, very quickly) on the Korean war. I'd rather delete this answer if that's the case. Let's start with a timeline (Jun 25, 1950 – ...


15

King Narmer is credited with unifying Ancient Egypt. The Upper Kingdom (South) conquered the Lower Kingdom (North)


14

Tank commanders will often stand up in their hatch with their head out of the turret to get a better look around. In this position they were vulnerable to being shot, and quite a few tank commanders were shot by infantry of all kinds, including snipers. A good sniper might be able to get a bullet through a vision slit, and some probably did. But firing at ...


11

The Muslim Arabs conquered the Persian (Sasanian) empire and the largest part of the Byzantine empire. The Romans conquered Gaul, and later Britain.


11

The SMS Geier was interned in November 1914 under Article 24 of the Convention Concerning the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers in Naval War, which formed part of the Hague Convention of 1907. The crew were detained under the terms of the same Article, and for the duration of hostilities. When the United States entered the war on 6 April 1917, the crew ...


10

Seems to check out, for a small part at least: With 80 men moved out, with 81 returned home The relief at home was great: "Already in Nendeln the contingent of authorities, relatives and population was celebrated," says Geiger. And the legend is true: The 80 Liechtenstein soldiers came home with one more soldier whom the troop had won as a friend. "...


10

Politics, collaboration and trust dictated the routes of the armies to the Holy Land during the crusades. Each crusade is different from the others, with different participants, different nations, different objectives, different interests, different periods and different geopolitical situations. The routes to reach the holy land were studied carefully and ...


10

There were many practical reasons why Switzerland was not occupied of which none of the first answer of @AmorphouBob apply Some of these reasons are: militarily Switzerland was considered a 'thorny' problem, as expressed in the question and the Swiss strategy there was no strategic advantage (Switzerland was surrounded by the Axis powers) an economic ...


9

Yes. The Kushites of the upper (more inland, or southern) Nile valley. The Kushites certainly did their time as Egyptian vassals themselves. However, sometime around 727 BCE they invaded Egypt, starting an 80 year period where they ruled the country as the 25th Dynasty. Maximum extent of Kush in 700 BC. While not as extreme as this, it was also fairly ...


9

Not sure if this counts as it relates to a weapon release mechanism rather than the weapon itself, but during World War II, an American B-17 bomber crew apparently used a toilet to better control dropping jellied gasoline onto German fighters which approached them from below. This account is related by Lt. Dewayne Bennett, a B-17 pilot of the 384th ...


9

This question is too broad, but I'll give you some avenues of research. Note all the countries you use as examples mention were puppet states and colonies right up until, and a bit after, WW2. Iraq and Libya were carved from former Ottoman states, and the Ottoman Empire was not known for its efficiency. These territories were seized by the Allies after WW1 ...


9

The question, whatever objections are made to its phrasing, boils down to: India won 3 wars easily and hasn't pushed its advantage to take over Pakistani Kashmir. Why? This is highly speculative, but I wonder what India would gain from taking over Pakistani Kashmir. Policing Indian Kashmir has been a money drain, international embarrassment (India ...


8

I have come to the conclusion that this bullet originated from an M61 Vulcan cannon. Developed shortly after WW2, and in common use over the last few decades in Switzerland. Even today the Swiss Airforce fly the F/A-18 with the M61 Vulcan cannon mounted. It is hard to place a timestamp on when the bullet was fired, given the many years of use. Based on the ...


8

This is an hypothetical question. I'll try to answer based only on the military concept. You have already answered your own question, in part 4. You don't need to conquer the whole country; only the main cities and the fields are desirable. Forget about the mountains; you don't need them. Once in a while they'll have to attack some places to prevent ...


8

Your question is premised on some incorrect assumptions: Casualties were not that high. The U.S. Army enlisted over 11 million men and suffered less than 500,000 killed and MIA, only a bit more wounded (but many of whom returned to service). Overall percentage killed was 2.2%. Yes, the U.S. military is known for its long tail, but even for the pointy end of ...


7

Question: The reason for the stalemate of the korean war. . Short Answer: The United Nations forces did not enjoy overwhelming Military Advantages in the Korean War. The UN forces had no answer for the Soviet T-34(medium tank) initially in the Korean war. US Army War College: The Armor Debacle in Korea, 1950: ...


7

The length of time in which you have to bury someone for practical reasons is mainly affected by temperature. You can see this by looking at different cultures, where waiting a week or more may be OK for a Russian but in Muslim culture (from the Middle East) one day is the limit. Some rain forest tribes don't even take a body back to village - they literally ...


6

Yes, the soviet defeat in Afghanistan was a major contributor to the fall of the Soviet Union. The Red Army was the institutional guarantee of the Soviet Unions stability; it brought together draftees from all of the member republics into a single organization under Russian domination which could be used to control those same republics and could be used to ...


6

No, wars break out because of finite resources and outcome is never 100% certain Wars generally start when there is a finite amount of something ( land, oil, cattle, women, gold ...) and both sides want that something for their own use. This goes for all kind of wars, including religious (both sides want to organize society in a single territory according ...


5

NO. The Roman army was made up of "professional" soldiers, who served 25 years (from their late teens to their early 40s, like modern ball players), before they were disbanded. No medieval armies had soldiers of this standing, although the Kommenians came closer than others. This started after the Punic Wars, when cheap grain acquired from Sicily (and ...


5

I have an example of three generations of a European family invading the Middle East. Fredrick I Barbarossa, Emperor of the Romans, lead a large army in the Third Crusade but drowned when crossing a river in what is now Turkey. His son Henry VI, Emperor of the Romans, sent a force of crusaders to the Middle East. Henry VI's son, Emperor of the Romans ...


5

Question: Why did Ancient Greek city-states fight each other and how did they moraly justify it? This is a great question. I choose to answer it by not just discussing the motivations for their internal wars but the systemic reason why Greece was so unstable (no empowered central authority). How the lessons have influenced the evolution of other ...


5

Question: When was the last profitable war? I would say all wars are profitable for somebody. The second gulf war has been estimated by both the chief economist of the world bank (a nobel prize winning economist) and a Harvard Economy Professor to cost 3 trillion dollars by when it's all said and done back in 2008. A lot of people walked away from that ...


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