Hot answers tagged

287

The idea that "most wars are caused by religion" is trivially false. From what I can see, this is a rhetoric rooted in a critique of theism, rather than serious historical analysis. Even a casual survey of history shows most wars had little to nothing to do with religious differences - according to quasi-original research on Wikipedia, only 6.98% of known ...


87

Do historians agree that most wars are caused by religion? No, historians have not formed such a consensus. There are numerous scholarly works reaching back 5 millennia demonstrating that this belief is apocryphal. This work demonstrates religion historically has played a small role in wars either as a major or minor cause. Is Religion the Cause of ...


57

The Ten-Day War, in 1990, was Slovenia's war of independence from Yugoslavia. During this war, at least a few battles took places within 10-20 km of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant, which had been operating since 1983. The map from Wikipedia shows at least three battles in the vicinity; below, I've annotated the map with the Krško plant's location. (Note ...


54

Best example I know of is the Zhaporizhia Nuclear Power Plant. Its in Southern Ukraine, which unfortunately put it right within the area that the Russians "separatist rebel forces" wanted to use to carve themselves a corridor of Russian territory through Ukraine to Crimea in 2014. I don't believe the city itself was directly attacked, but it was at one ...


53

No country is impossible to invade. Andorra could invade the USA. The question you should have asked was "Was Switzerland Impossible to Conquer during World War II?". The answer is no country is impossible to conquer. But there is great variation in the probability that a specific country will actually conquer another specific country if it tries to ...


44

Question: Was Japan known to be a potential threat to the USA in the 10 year period prior to 1941 Short Answer Yes some military experts did realize the inevitability of war between the United States and Japan as early as 1912. Most did not up until the late 1930s. No conventional wisdom in the 1930's would not permit the American public to ...


38

Ok, since I think I finally got your real question (as I see it): I'm simply asking if the defense of Switzerland during WW2 was overrated. Many people claim that the country was impossible to occupy, I just want to know if this is not clearly exaggerated. The emphasis is what I interpret as your "real" question (since there is a lot of confusion here) ...


36

Hitler gave his reasons to the German people via a radio broadcast on the morning of June 22nd, 1941. At 0500 GMT, an hour after the invasion began, the Nazi Minister for Propaganda, Joseph Goebbels, went on national radio to read a proclamation by Adolf Hitler The proclamation can be seen here in full. Basically, Hitler argued that the Soviets were ...


33

In addition to the good answers given already, I'd like to point out that wars are typically not mono-causal. Very often, several reasons as well as causes (i.e. sparks that light the fire) come together for a war to start. In addition, the reasons given in public are often not the actual reasons. There are a number of explicitly religious wars (the Islamic ...


31

Unless a particular Air Force General 'fesses up in an autobiography, the first question is unanswerable. On the second question, absolutely that was happening. It had been happening for years, escalating in quantity and variety of supplies transported, since at least 1959. The supply trail was known as the Ho Chi Minh Trail, ran through the mountains of ...


25

What factors were Hitler's / Germany's motivations for WW2? Revanchism, stealing raw materials, and racial hatreds. The Swiss are largely German-speaking / Germanic, so there's no "racial superiority" factor to promote invasion and de facto depopulation/extermination and colonization. They don't have a excessive amount of arable land for "true German" ...


21

The Germans were certain they could. For instance, their 1940 plans for Operation Tannenbaum estimated that a force of 300,000 to 500,000 men would have been sufficient. Swiss military leadership also thought that an invasion would have been successful: Their revised military plan for the event of an invasion, the Réduit national, called for a delaying ...


20

There are two kinds of τρόπαιον (tropaion) the battlefiled tropaion and the more permanent trophy, like an arch built to commemorate a military victory. The latter are then public buildings in a city. The battle field tropaion of that period was In the Greek city-states of the Archaic period, the tropaion would be set up on the battlefield itself, ...


19

In 1981, Israel intentionally destroyed an Osiris-class research reactor. Basically, they flew in, bombed it to pieces, then flew away. While this was a just a sneak attack and not a part of protracted hostilities, it most certainly was an act of war. Please read more about this on wikipedia.


17

Based on the persistent comments by Hans, this new OP seems really keen to get an answer. So I will try. But I have a qualifier, and that is I'm not really that interested in rehashing political debates (which it could turn into, very quickly) on the Korean war. I'd rather delete this answer if that's the case. Let's start with a timeline (Jun 25, 1950 – ...


16

Dimona Nuclear Research center is not a commercial power plant but it is 50 miles from the border with Gaza, which is a permanent war zone.


15

King Narmer is credited with unifying Ancient Egypt. The Upper Kingdom (South) conquered the Lower Kingdom (North)


15

Tank commanders will often stand up in their hatch with their head out of the turret to get a better look around. In this position they were vulnerable to being shot, and quite a few tank commanders were shot by infantry of all kinds, including snipers. A good sniper might be able to get a bullet through a vision slit, and some probably did. But firing at ...


11

A Gallup poll conducted just prior to the Pearl Harbour attack in 1941 found that: 52% of Americans expected war with Japan. 27% did not. 21% had no opinion. So there's that.


11

The Muslim Arabs conquered the Persian (Sasanian) empire and the largest part of the Byzantine empire. The Romans conquered Gaul, and later Britain.


10

Seems to check out, for a small part at least: With 80 men moved out, with 81 returned home The relief at home was great: "Already in Nendeln the contingent of authorities, relatives and population was celebrated," says Geiger. And the legend is true: The 80 Liechtenstein soldiers came home with one more soldier whom the troop had won as a friend. "...


10

Politics, collaboration and trust dictated the routes of the armies to the Holy Land during the crusades. Each crusade is different from the others, with different participants, different nations, different objectives, different interests, different periods and different geopolitical situations. The routes to reach the holy land were studied carefully and ...


10

There were many practical reasons why Switzerland was not occupied of which none of the first answer of @AmorphouBob apply Some of these reasons are: militarily Switzerland was considered a 'thorny' problem, as expressed in the question and the Swiss strategy there was no strategic advantage (Switzerland was surrounded by the Axis powers) an economic ...


9

Not sure if this counts as it relates to a weapon release mechanism rather than the weapon itself, but during World War II, an American B-17 bomber crew apparently used a toilet to better control dropping jellied gasoline onto German fighters which approached them from below. This account is related by Lt. Dewayne Bennett, a B-17 pilot of the 384th ...


9

Some people did, most didn't. Billy Mitchell, among others, warned. But most people didn't see those funny little yellow men with thick glasses and hilarious swords (stereotype of the day) as really dangerous. Not for America, anyway. Yes, the massacre of Nanking was widely known, but that was somewhere far, far away. In 1937 there had been an incident in ...


9

Visiting the aftermath of the Russo-Japanese war in 1905 Mitchell went for some time inspecting 'the area'. Stationed primarily for two years in the Philipines, he went on "an undercover reconnaissance mission of Japanese activities in the islands lying between Formosa and the Philippines". After visiting the battle fields of the 1905 war he studied Chinese, ...


9

Yes. The Kushites of the upper (more inland, or southern) Nile valley. The Kushites certainly did their time as Egyptian vassals themselves. However, sometime around 727 BCE they invaded Egypt, starting an 80 year period where they ruled the country as the 25th Dynasty. Maximum extent of Kush in 700 BC. While not as extreme as this, it was also fairly ...


9

This question is too broad, but I'll give you some avenues of research. Note all the countries you use as examples mention were puppet states and colonies right up until, and a bit after, WW2. Iraq and Libya were carved from former Ottoman states, and the Ottoman Empire was not known for its efficiency. These territories were seized by the Allies after WW1 ...


9

The question, whatever objections are made to its phrasing, boils down to: India won 3 wars easily and hasn't pushed its advantage to take over Pakistani Kashmir. Why? This is highly speculative, but I wonder what India would gain from taking over Pakistani Kashmir. Policing Indian Kashmir has been a money drain, international embarrassment (India ...


8

Wikipedia suggest the yearly trail capacity in 1968 was between 10000 (1964) tons, 81000 (1968 reserved offensive supplies) tons and 40000 (end 1970) tons. It usefully doesn’t specify which ton. The first and last estimate appear to be for the overland route controlled by the 559th. Nixon’s statement regarding the logistic capacity of the PLAF/PAVN appears ...


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