15

Modern Yoga as it is known in the West gained traction in the late 1890s, when Indian monks began transmitting their knowledge to the Western world. Specifically, the influential Swami Vivekananda is often credited with introducing Yoga to the West. Yoga was introduced into the West by an Indian sage called Swami Vivekanada, who demonstrated Yoga postures ...


14

Socrates changed how philosophy itself was to be conceived. Rather than a "sophist" ("wise one" - the tag often used for earlier Greek philosophers), Socrates described himself simply as a "philo-sopher" ("lover of wisdom"). Michael Picard makes this point in his Bedside Book of Philosophy: [Socrates] eschewed rhetorical devices that deceived the ...


14

I'll lead with Sacagawea (May 1788 - December 1812), the guide/interpreter for Lewis and Clark who clearly is both objectively famous, and lacks both an entry in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica and even a mention in the article for Meriwether Lewis. Update: - from Sacagewea Dollar - Initial Design Selection on Wikipedia (my emphasis) the Commission ...


11

Excellent question; we often hear that "life was better before" and that "back in the day when there was a single bread winner, things were awesome." I contend that this presumption is a little off. To answer it we must look at the demographics of a country to get an answer. Let's look at the USA at 1900: The 1900 census reported that the US had 60 % of its ...


6

As near as I can tell, the only western country (for some definitions of "western") that was directly involved in a war in early 2001 was Russia in the Second Chechen War. Israel, if you count them, was dealing with the Second Intifada. Roughly on that level there was an ethnic Albanian insurgency in Macedonia. That is certainly a low ebb. The number of ...


6

For the purpose of getting a good thorough grounding in Western ancient history, I highly suggest picking up a copy of Colin McEvedy's The New Penguin Atlas of Ancient History*. It takes a base map that covers all of Europe, North Africa, and the Near East, and shows it on every other page. The only thing that changes on the map is the year it depicts, and ...


6

You might want to go to the source of this theory as presented in the article Absolute Chronology in the Andean Area American Antiquity, Vol. 10, No. 3 (Jan., 1945), pp. 265-284. This only forms the basis for that theory as it was later developed. A first priming definition of terminology: The following eras of ancient Peru (1800 BC-AD 1534) have been ...


6

Through the musket era, formed troops prevailed through achieving higher rates of fire. With rates exceeding 4 shots per minute for Wellington's Peninsular veterans, and claimed to approach 6 shots per minute for Frederick's Prussian Guards, a rate of 2 per minute (as in the video) is horrendously bad for formed infantry. Likewise it seems clear that the ...


6

Well played sir, well played! Drake has persuaded me to offer a bad answer. This is a bad answer because I'm going to cite a set of generalizations without either the sources that I prefer or the extensive scholarship of the god king of H:SE. If you want a one sentence answer, growing communications, a broader distribution of economic power to ...


6

Thasunke Itko or Crazy Horse (c. 1840-1877) has no known image from his lifetime. There is a photograph allegedly but not certainly of him, and a drawing based on his sister's description made in 1934. And a giant statue being carved in a mountain since 1948. But there is no certainly authentic photograph or drawing made during his lifetime. And the ...


5

I am intentionally scorning your arbitrary definition of "famous". There is a very famous contemporary British artist called Banksy, of whom there is no image, photographic or otherwise.


5

China actually had two separate ones: The Yellow river and the Yangtze. The Yellow river is likely the initial homeland of the Han people. However, the Yangtze is where the staple crop of rice was most likely domesticated. Eventually the Han expanded and overran the Yangtze basin as well, supplanting the locals. However, they kept their rice. Other places ...


4

One might be better off regarding the Durants as the Newton or Maxwell, not the Feynman or Fermi, of history. Newtonian Mechanics and Classical Electromagnetism is just fine for building a highway, or even putting an astronaut into orbit, but will simply mislead in attempts to build semiconductor devices or nuclear reactors. In your earlier question you ...


4

First, let's clarify; declaring something illegal does not prevent people from doing that thing. Burglary is illegal, but it happens. Sexual harassment is illegal, but it happens. So all of the examples listed are... not really relevant to understanding or answering the question. The examples lead more to confusion than resolution. Second you are citing ...


3

In the late sixties. This is called "sexual revolution", and some social scientists explain it by invention of reliable and convenient contraceptives ("the Pill"). Of course, decline in religion is also an important ingredient, but this process began much earlier, I mean in Western Europe. In other parts of the world this happened later. For example in the ...


3

krishnamacharya is considered the father of modern yoga in the west. He was the teacher to bks iyengar, pattabhi jois, tkv desikachar, and indra devi. These four students came to the west to teach. Most of hatha yoga, the physical form of yoga that has become the main adopted western form of yoga, owes its lineage to krishnamacharya.


3

Bhakti yoga, which forms the core spiritual practice of yoga traditions was brought to the west for the first time in known history by HDG AC BhaktiVedanta Swami Prabhupada. He founded the Hare Krishna Movement in New York city in 1965 and established 108 temples + farm communities all over the world.


3

In brief (but over-simplified) terms, as to why he is considered a founder of Western philosophy, he lived during the ancient era and Socrates' philosophical ideas have been research/followed by subsequent generation of philosophers. For instance, his descendants are known as the Socratics (the previous link part of Lectures on the History of Philosophy by ...


2

This is the question of modern world history. In fact it is a huge set of questions on which a lot has been written. The Wikipedia article on Great Divergence gives a pretty good summary of some important work on the topic. I won't try to cover everything in there, but I will elaborate on a couple of key points that come to mind based on the original ...


2

This question is discussed –though not succinctly- in Jacques Barzun’s From Dawn to Decadence. It largely started with an idealized revival of Greek philosophy. But it wasn’t an event but rather a multistep process. The course to study is western Civilization, though I've heard that it's gone extinct.


2

Without being bogged down by multiple stipulations in history I'll attempt to answer this as simply as possible. Most likely Europe advanced rapidly due to mercantilism and the free flow of ideas into Europe due to closer relationships with other cultures from trading. We borrowed the great ideas and inventions of the world then made them our own or ...


2

In the early 1900s, most household work (other than the man's profession) was done at home. That is, nearly all meals were prepared at home (instead of going to restaurants. Clothes were cleaned (and made) at home, instead of being cleaned at a drycleaners or being purchased from a department store. Children played at home (instead of going to soccer, or ...


1

You can't find much info about grants as scholarships from the government are a fairly recent development. In the 18th and 19th century rich individuals gave grants. The terms of each grant varied very much. Your teenager is probably a child of the lower or (lower) middle class. Most likely the middle class. It wasn't impossible for lower class children, ...


1

Those are now unused terms, they were partially used during the American Independence but here's what they mean: An extensive revolution is one in which events happen in a similar way in small areas as part of a larger area. What that means is that is you split that land into smaller sections you will have a directly proportional number of people revolting. ...


1

Also his works are some of the oldest surviving works. They were translated from latin to Arabic and then to other languages


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