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2

I would agree with Royal Engineers. The lapel badge of the Royal Fusiliers, although similar to the RE, is more "splayed - eg !


3

It's called the substitution effect in economics. Eggs are fundamentally cheaper than other forms of protein such as meat or fish. When shortages of "high end" proteins cause their prices to rise, people "trade down" to eggs. The prices of eggs rise less in absolute terms than those of the other proteins. But eggs rise more in percentage terms (from a ...


21

I agree with Kobunite, but by a different route. I can't make out the cap badge well enough to identify it positively, but the collar badges are either Royal Artillery or Royal Engineers, which are quite similar. The cap badge definitely isn't Royal Artillery, which looks like this: So he's Royal Engineers. The uniform is that of a commissioned officer: the ...


10

Starting with the regiment - looking at the cap badge (see below), I believe that he was in the Corps of Royal Engineers. The uniform appears to be that of a commissioned officer, however the exact rank will be difficult as the British Army wears rank insignia on the shoulder boards and sleeves.


-1

A fact pertinent to this question is that many of the Brits shot at dawn are remembered at the National Memorial Arboretum where their ages are shown, if they were adults. Many were in actual fact children who had signed up illegally, but were shot anyway when they realised their error and tried to escape the nightmare, and these are shown in the memorial ...


1

I think Russell Borogove approach is correct. But the change of concept is sensitive for each country. While you look in english is natural that the change occurs during world war two, because for english speaking people both wars were important. I mean, when world war two becomes an important war as the first one, then the change happens in english. But, ...


5

The existing answers ignore the fact that the term "The World War" was used already during the war itself and even though maybe less commonly than "The Great War", it was not rare at all. In fact "The Great War" was used even before WW1 as a name for other conflicts. The need to add a distinguishing "First" only emerged when the possibility of another world ...


65

Alexander Watson says more about this in chapter 7 of The Cambridge History of the First World War, Volume II: The State: The Germans were most sparing in applying the death penalty because their justice system was staffed by professional legal personnel and influenced more than that of other forces by civilian norms. Their courts’ concern with ...


2

In this photograph, an individual identified as an Austro-Hungarian soldier seems to be wearing a similar uniform, complete with the three dots on the gorget (collar), epaulets, belt, and bayonet. Your image is too dark to make out the pocket details. Since Istria was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire until 1918 someone from that region serving in the A-H ...


7

Summary: Trenches were often dug in un-wrecked countryside, but attacks on, and defence of those trenches, created the familiar scenes of devastation. The entrenched Western Front of WWI developed as a consequence of the Race to the Sea. This phase of the war lasted from mid-September to mid-October 1914, as the Allied and German armies repeatedly tried to ...


0

The reason it may not have been obvious to them that they overreached at Sevres is that they spent much of the war imagining how they would change the map of the Near East with tsarist Russia as one of the victorious powers. When Russia got knocked out, the other allies somewhat understandably but very mistakenly thought they could grab for themselves what ...


0

This treaty has clearly underestimated, as stated in user26763's answer, the power of the nationalism movement of Turkey. However, this tretay is perfectly in the mindset of the other treaties made at the same time, which dismantled as well the Austrian Empire and the Russian Empire, and with the mindset of the Allies which was: "Divide in order to reign". ...


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