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Kaiser in German is like Czar in Russian. Both mean emperor, both are derived from Caesar. Would the History Channel call the Russian emperor Czar or Emperor? I think Czar. You mentioned yourself the Bulgarian Czar. I would expect most American audiences to connect the title Czar with the Russian emperor.


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I remember to have read in Ernst Jüngers "In Stahlgewittern", the English translation is called Storm of Steel, that Jünger felt, that the churned up soil near the front lines dampened the effect of artillery shells. Furthermore, he also wrote, that the Germans felt quite safe in their bunkers. So, to add another point, although admittedly poorly sourced: ...


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There were tests before the war and before some offensives of WW1. But there was two points with the battle of the Somme: First artillery shellings were aimed mostly at the first trenches of the global defense system of the Germans, which was built in depth (in depth as military significance, which is far from the front line, not under the ground. Those ...


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This is clearly a translation problem. The pamphlet clearly speaks about Hungarians who, according to the paper, are bloodthirstily willing the revenge toward the kind and gentle russians who have saved Hungarians from their Ukrainity. The paper is written in a mixture of a convoluted officialese (канцелярит), densely decorated with patriotic speech and ...


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Those who were killed in battle were indeed generally buried on the spot. Many of those temporary burials remain lost to this day, and the names of the fallen are recorded on monuments erected near the battlefields. The 4,700 Indian soldiers and labourers who lost their lives on the Western Front during the First World War and have no known grave are ...


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The process would probably take some time, but how much depends on where the soldier was serving, and the circumstances of his death. Victoria Cross recommendations in the 20th century have been investigated rather carefully, which takes time. The family are likely to be notified first that their son has been killed in action. That might be by post or ...


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This is FERDINAND BEHR. He was defending Princip after the assassination. That's why he's arrested too. From Wikipedia: This picture is often said to depict the arrest of en:Gavrilo Princip, although several scholars say that it depicts the arrest of Ferdinand Behr, a bystander who was initially suspected of involvement in the assassination.


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Not until the time of the tank. "Repeating" rifles of the late 1800s brought about the rise of trench warfare. (Ditto for other "repeating weapons such as machine guns and Gatling guns.) That's because a defender with such a weapon in a static position had the advantage over an attacker who had to run and fire at the same time. Trenches, and other ...


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