15

Tropical environments like Guadalcanal are rather abundant with food, if you know enough to find it. That of course is the key. That generally requires native knowledge, gathered through generations of observation and (often dangerous) trial-and-error. But there is a limit. Hunting and gathering just doesn't support as many people for the same acreage as ...


10

Was the M3 carbine used on Okinawa? Yes, as the T3 carbine with the T120 sniperscope. They would later be classified as the M3 carbine with the M1 sniperscope. [Note: pictured is a T3 carbine with an M2 sniperscope] While it had a scope, it wasn't a sniper weapon. The infrared scope had an effective range of about 70 meters which matched well with the short ...


9

Indirectly Historically, Sweden ended trade with Germany in November 1944. That is a bit late in the war, and Allies pressured them to do something much earlier, but there was always a threat of German army stationed in Norway and Sweden was practically isolated in Scandinavian peninsula. Add to that significant part of population that were anti-Communist ...


7

A quick dash at Google . . . Some sources report that there were some 600 coast watchers, others report a count of 700; of whom, regardless of the total serving, 38 lost their lives. Using the lower number, that is about a 6% loss rate. See anzacportal and Navy.gov.au from which you can download this PDF article on the subject and coastwatchers presents ...


5

According to both links you give, the plant was opened in 1911 with 108MW capacity. Any generators operating in 1911 will not be in operation today. The NVE link further says that the plant was rebuilt in 1971 with a capacity of 200MW. NVE also say that it was closely associated with the Saheim power station (geographically and operationally, it sounds like)....


5

As far as sinking submarines wwas concerned, from the USN perspective may I suggest a look at https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/rep/ASW-51/ASW-PART-II.html which discusses antisubmarine measures and effectiveness. For ascribing some sort of credit, you will find that reports of attacks on submarines by surface craft were evaluated as: A. Known sunk; B. ...


5

Tank commander was a matter of rank, not age. The typical US Army enlisted tank commander, and I am only addressing the US Army in this missive, was a sergeant, with eleven of them commanding tanks out of eighteen tanks in the average medium tank company. Three tanks assigned to the company HQ and five to each of three platoons. At the company HQ, one ...


3

A subject on which entire books have been written, some of the basic source information: US 6th Army report on the Japanese plans for the defense of Kyushu can be found at the CARL site, specifically here: http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p4013coll8/id/1148/rec/3 The summary of this report, in part states: “By the end of July 1945, ...


2

German Wikipedia suggests the power of each generator is 16.400 HP, or ~12MW, bringing the total power to ~120MW. (cited source: Schweizerische Bauzeitung, Heft 24, Band 63/64 (1914)) That is not quite exactly the 108MW so there might be some confusion going on regarding watts and volt-amperes (or, in other word, effective vs. apparent power). The local ...


2

Buried in https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2015/03/22/sailing-into-starvation-island-70-years-after-the-end-of-world-war-ii-peace-boat-visits-guadalcanal/ one finds: “In Japan, Guadalcanal is known as ‘Starvation Island,’ where some 22,000 Japanese and 7000 Americans died in land, sea, and air battles, and of malaria, dysentery and starvation. . .” Here, ...


1

I assume the question around the question is also "could the Marines forage on location"? You need to keep in mind that the initial stages of the combat around Henderson Field were rather constrained: I'd guess about 10-20 KM2 beachhead (maps of it generally have no/unreadable scales) that terrain gets frequently bombed and shelled by the Japanese,...


1

Quite easy. They looked it up in the registry. Prior to WW2 civilian records also hold fields for religion and (sometimes) ancestry. That's how they catalogued and rounded up Jews living in the occupied territories. Simply by going to the civil administration and go through the records.


1

There were several methods: Public records. Personal documents. For example in Soviet union every adult living in a city had to have an "interior passport". This interior passport did not show "religion" but it had another entry: "nationality" (roughly translated from the Russian as ethnicity). For example: Russian, Ukrainian, ...


1

Looks, surnames, census and birth records, local population ... First of all, Jews belong to Semitic peoples, they were often voluntarily or involuntarily separated from host nation (mostly because of religion), and usually didn't intermarry. This did start to change in 19th century, but in WW2 lots of Jews still had distinct Middle Eastern appearance . ...


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