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Game theory was indeed, developed around the time of World War II. The example generally cited is the dilemma facing American Air Force General George Kenney in New Guinea. There were two east-west routes across New Guinea for Japanese convoys, the cloudy northern route, and the sunny southern route. A convoy used the southern route, one of two things would ...


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South America was the most "neutral" part of the world, on a globe that was overwhelmingly pro-Ally. Germany, Italy, and Japan were all occupied by the Allies, so they were "out." Moreover, nearly all European nations had suffered from German occupation. Spain and Portugal were important exceptions, and within Europe, might have been the &...


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Surprisingly, the process of return (re-evacuation) is not that well studied. I could find a couple of dissertations (mostly focussed on people migration than industries per se, but they are closely linked), all in Russian. My brief take is this: There was a small wave of re-evacuation from as early as December 1941, right after the Battle of Moscow, ...


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In many cases, but not in all cases, the result was 2 factories instead of one: one on the original place, another at the place where the factory was moved. For example, Kharkiv tractor plant was moved in 1941 first to Stalingrad, and then to Rubtsovsk (Rубцовск) near Barnaul. After re-occupation of Kharkiv, the main part moved back to Kharkiv, while Barnaul ...


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I can see why you asked this question, there is frustratingly little information about the redispersion of industry following the end of WWII. I did find some information regarding the city of Novosibirsk in Siberia. It grew rapidly during the war and continued to grow rapidly after the war. That is because Novosibirsk received a good number of relocated ...


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According to this source (pp/ 13-15), Japan relied somewhat on small pig iron plants for "local" operations. In 1943, some 111, 000 tons of iron ore were produced in such plants, of which about 30,000 tons each were produced in Japan, Manchuria/North Chna, and Korea. Much smaller amounts were produced in Formosa, and centralChina. (This was a small ...


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One of the most authoritative, go-to, books, in English, on the subject of Japanese Naval aviation is Mark Peattie’s Sunburst – The Rise of Japanese Naval Air Power 1909-1941. (See review by Robert Cressman, of the US Naval Historical Command, for the US Naval War College Review, here.) Peattie makes no mention of a doctrinal mandatory arrestor wire. ...


2

Most of experienced Japanese troops, that had been used to do the bright land conquests of 1942, were destroyed in shipping in South Pacific (5th division) or were stuck in the battle of Burma until destruction by combined British, American and Chinese forces. However, a lot of Japanese troops stayed in China for most of the war, even if they were mostly ...


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Yes, the Japanese garrison could have fed itself because this is enough square miles to feed such a number of troops. However, this does not change at all the issue of the war: New Britain offered no facilities for the development of ammunition nor military material, so the Japanese garrison in New Britain would have still been blockaded and bombed by the US ...


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UK Pre-decimal Currency: there were twenty shillings (s) to a pound and twelve pence (d) to a shilling. If written '7/6, this means 7 shillings and 6 pence. Exchange rate: for most of the war, £1 = $4.03 so 1 shilling was about 20 US cents. Prices varied enormously, depending on the theatre, the cast, and (especially) where you were seated. A box for four or ...


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According to terramedia.co.uk the average price of a theater ticket in London in 1940 was 4.37 pence. The site has prices for other years if you need that information.,


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Yes, there are two versions of the picture, one with Simon Toncman edited out. And the editing is easily detectable. Why? The obvious conclusion is that it's because he's showing more crotch than someone considered appropriate. Odd how the obscenity of those emaciated bodies was OK, but any hint of a crotch was verboten. But people are funny like that. ...


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Sergeant American Culin invented the Rhinos: the use of the Rhino was as followed: The tank drives at 25 mph It goes through the hedgerow thanks to the prong Other tanks could use the breach to advance without exposing too much 1/ The bocage battle During the bocage battle to Cherbourg, the Americans started to use the Rhino tanks: it did help them to ...


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The original photo is the one with the man standing on the right, which is available from the National Archives as used in high resolution on Wikipedia. The New York Times version, with the man on the right missing, was manipulated by the New York Times. This is a photo used in conspiracy theories. The alternative version in higher resolution was indeed ...


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I decided to pay what was needed1 to get past the paywall, and can confirm that the man on the right is not in the image in the May 6th, 1945 New York Times Magazine article titled "The World Must Not Forget". Here's a screenshot of the image from the article: The photo was also published a week earlier, on April 29th, in the New York Times proper ...


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"Became common" is a tiny bit tricky. The light tubes themselves went into larger scale production in the 1880s. But: Electricity itself wasn't that penetrating until after WW2. Then of course "Europe" is a somewhat big but incredibly fragmented place. For cities —and with a focus on in Germany— we see: The new tube quickly spread all ...


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