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2

First of all, I can't tell you what it is, but I can tell you what it is not. This is not a US Army or US Army Air Corps uniform. In WW2 and for some time thereafter, one can even find use today by DOD employees, the standard “Civilian Uniform” for civilian employees was the army green uniform (in the vernacular “pinks and greens”, the difference being ...


2

The British SOE trained and infiltrated two Czech agents to assassinate Reinhard Heydrich in 1942. And while Czech citizens paid a terrible price for that act, a truly nasty Nazi had been eliminated.


9

They did, but the amounts of stuff they were able to deliver was not enough. Firstly: air superiority. Soviets didn't have that in the first part of the war. But they tried to supply nonetheless, at night for example. Secondly: sufficient number of suitable transport planes as well as transport containers to supply the troops. They lacked specialized ...


1

It is difficult to pinpoint an exact date or even month when the Luftwaffe lost air superiority, because the Luftwaffe's defeat was a slow downhill spiral for about 18 months comprised of many smaller victories and defeats. There are 3 points along this timeline that could be considered the "loss" of Luftwaffe air superiority. First, The allied ...


0

Found dlozeve.github.io while cruising around looking for something else entirely. Have you seen it?


4

Possibly yes but no concrete proof I found this list of units operating Me-262 during the war. What we have mentioned is Erprobungskommando 262, Kommando Nowotny, Kommando Schenk (Conversion unit for bomber pilots), KG 51 (Kampfgeschwader 51 Staff unit, as well as Gruppen I and II), Kommando Edelweis (Experimental unit usin KG 51 pilots), Jagdgeschwader 7, ...


0

They used Bf 109s in an air defense role in the vicinity of the field. The Me 262 was due to low speed, very vulnerable in landing configuration and at ground. It didn't help that the engines were thirsty and so to conserve fuel, the pilots were instructed to shut down as soon as possible and let tractors and special motorcycles pull the aircraft into its ...


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Would you mix petrol and diesel engines in a factory or a car repair shop? Of course not. Airplanes are vastly more complex than cars. Especially those with jet engines. Airplanes of the same type flew (and still fly today!) in the same unit. WW2 German or modern American makes planes no difference. Operationally you can 'mix and match', for example a flight ...


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