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British favored firepower and speed. IN any battleship (or battlecruiser) you negotiate the Triad. A compromise between three variables Speed (horsepower) Firepower (offense) Armor (Weight) A ship with smaller guns carries more ammunition......but less hitting power from ranges past 10,000 yards. A ship with More armor, weighs more thus engine power is ...


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I was going to comment, but decided to answer instead. It’s plausible a few German U-boats DID taunt allied ships during WW 2, but it was also a dangerous gamble which could cost the entire U-boat their lives with little reward... As illustrated in Greyhound, where all the U-boats died. There are, however, several factors working against the scenario, ...


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There is a tale of communication between a convoy and a Luftwaffe aircraft. The convoy was one of the Arctic convoys to the USSR, the aircraft was a BV 138 flying boat. That kind of plane had no business attacking a convoy with decent anti-aircraft armament; its job was to stay in sight of the convoy and transmit homing signals for U-boats and strike ...


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Yes, but probably not as portrayed Did they communicate with Allied ships? Yes. Taunt them? Maybe, but it's not documented as far as I know. During both World Wars, Germany observed, intermittently, the "Prize Rules," which governed attacks on merchant (not military) ships. While the Prize Rules were in effect, submarines were required to ...


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I convert my comment into an answer: No, absolutely not. Taunting, as in the movie, would have been a death sentence for the U Boat. The Germans were well aware about High Frequency Direction Finding or HF/DF. They knew any conversation lasting longer than 20 seconds was highly dangerous. They didn't know the exact specifications, but more than enough to ...


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Purely fictional. I have never heard of such an incident and, as with the large, bright red insignia painted on the conning towers, it puts the submarine in unnecessary danger for no advantage. In order to transmit, a U-Boat must be on or near the surface putting them in obvious danger to visual spotting and radar. While the first two transmissions come at ...


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Concerning the connection between George Kingsley Zipf and the Nazis, a couple of modern works give us some indication of the source of these concerns. The connection seems to mainly be from Zipf's 1941 publication, National Unity and Disunity; The Nation as a Bio-Social Organism. The 2017 book The Organization of Cities: Initiative, ordinary life, and the ...


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I decided to delve into RAN archives (all of my investigations below are based on 'Chapter 3 – Australia's Coast Raided – Her Flanks Strengthened') which have the best overviews of the Pacific War as far as I can see. They don't go into massive detail regarding this, but it does clear up a few things, primarily, that Nagumo knew about enemy surface forces ...


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A 20KT warhead is probably very much on the low end of what a volcano can do and how much damage a surface explosion it would do to a mountain is debatable. Mount St. Helens was a 24MT equivalent, from the inside, for example. Both Hiroshima/Nagasaki drops were airbursts. A groundburst on Fuji might have turned out to be anything but benign if it churned up ...


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"US" and "consider" are rather broad terms. I can't find any evidence that the Manhattan Project targeting committee ever considered anything other than conventional military targets, but there were plenty of other people throwing out ideas of what should be hit. A rather informal analysis of "blowing the top off a mountain" ...


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Not to hijack the question asked, but merely in an effort to keep the story straight, please accept that Lofton Henderson was not a lieutenant, he was a Major, USMC, commanding VMSB-241 on Midway and led the the Marine dive bomber attack on the Japanese carrier force. He was shot down and killed in this attack. An article in the “Marine Corps Gazette” Mar/...


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Hiryu had been stiken by Lieutnant Lofton Henderson. Hi bomber crashed on the deck of the carrier, forcing the ship to repair apart from the main fleet. Repair teams were efficient, but could not manage to allow a full scale-operating of the aircraft carrier, so it was decided to send airplanes in small groups, in accordance with the capabilities of launch.


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For a print work I recommend Francis L. Loewenheim, Harold D. Langley, & Manfred Jonas, Editors; Roosevelt and Churchill: Their Secret Wartime Correspondence, Dutton, 1975. Contains some 600 or so of the more than 1700 cable messages which passed between Roosevelt and Churchill from shortly after the start of the war in 1939 until April 1945. Or if you ...


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During that period, both Churchill and Roosevelt were old men more used to hand written letters than "high technology" teletype writers. Teletype writers are NOISY! Using teletype writers can be a slow process & thus make a l-o-n-g conversation. Telephones, despite sophisticated encryption technology, are immediate and more intimate. In ...


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Why did the US Navy and Marine Corps use satanic symbolism in WW2? I believe the "evil" symbolism serves a purpose (unlike what others implied), and it's not primarily to intimidate the enemy. Few people realize this, but normal men do not naturally make good soldiers: Grossman was committed to helping the U.S. military become more effective in ...


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Short answer, Yes. A quick perusal of AVG pilot listings compared to USN or USMC postings after the AVG was disbanded shows some . . . Noel R Bacon – Served in NAOTC at NAAS Green Cove Spring, LCDR USNR (post war he was a CDR and commanded VC-62) Bronze Star Percy R Bartelt – served in NAOTC at NAS Pensacola, LT USNR, promoted to LCDR 5 November 1945 Lewis ...


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A Picture's Worth A Thousand Words... Why did the US Navy and Marine Corps use satanic symbolism in WW2? Ultimately for the same reason it's still using it today; as such, the real question would be why not? [T]he U.S. was largely [a] Christian country at that time. Which would probably explain why they heavily employed Christian symbolism associated ...


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Every story has three sides. One side's truth, the other side's truth, and what actually happened. Since 1933, Austria was a one-party state ruled by the Vaterländische Front, an Austrofascist party, with first Engelbert Dollfuss and then Kurt Schuschnigg as Chancellor with the power to rule by decree. While they shared much of the same ideology with both ...


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@nvoigt already did so, but I wanted to emphasise that an invasion is an act of violence. Further, though we don't need any more evidence, the OP themselves quoted incidents where the German invaders acted against Austrians (their religious preference had nothing to do with whether they were Austrians) with ill intent: March 11, 1938 On March 11–13, 1938, ...


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I think you are putting too much focus and emphasis on the one word translation of "gewaltsam". Yes, it can mean "violent", but it can just as well mean "forced" as in coerced under threat (most likely if nothing else is mentioned, the threat of violence). There is no doubt that this annexation was forced. You quoted it yourself,...


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Any one from the Aviation Branch could, depending on the needs of the service, be assigned as a crewman in a USN aircraft (though some more or less likely than others), and some not of the Aviation Branch, as well. Typically the usual ratings were: Chief Aviation Pilot (CAP); Aviation Pilot (AP1c, 2c); Aviation Chief Machinist's Mate (ACMM); Aviation ...


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