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6

It wasn't much of a war, so analyzing the performance is difficult When the Red Army had attacked Poland from the east on the 17th September 1939, it had used 465,000 troops and 485 tanks. Against them, there were 12,000 border defense troops and, a bit more to the west 200,000 mostly poorly armed conscripts, that were planned to be used to patch the loses ...


16

After the MG 34 was introduced in 1935, the Wehrmacht almost immediately wanted improvements. The MG 34 was milled from specially alloyed steel which is slow and expensive. Stamped parts could make a lighter, more reliable, cheaper to mass produce gun using lower grade steel. However, getting stamped parts to work at the tolerances and stresses of a firearm ...


4

It is hard to fathom nowadays with decades-long "jobs for the boys" projects like the F35, but weapon making, especially in wartime, can be greatly accelerated and benefit from skunk projects carried out by small teams. (note however that the inherent difference in complexity between a major weapon system - a fighter or tank - circa 1940 and 2020 ...


-1

No one knows what exactly would happen. Hitler's original goal was annexing Danzig and the "Polish corridor". The idea of partitioning of Poland and liquidating it as an state was the result of the German-Soviet pact. Also Polish resistance did not stop with the fall of Warsaw: Poland surrendered only after the Soviet invasion from the East which ...


2

Fall Weiss, the plan for the invasion of Poland, had (mostly) been laid out by the German general staff years before 1939. The earliest draft took place in the late 1920s. The idea was that Germany would attack Poland from three sides, west, north, and south. converging near Warsaw in the center of the country. Only the "details" changed with the ...


2

The context of the speeches to the Third Army is the preparation prior to Normandy's landings. For American soldiers involved in this operation, this was the first big action of the war. However US Army had already fought hard battles in Africa and hard landings in Sicilia and Italy. So Patton needed to motivate soldiers that had had a conventionnal training ...


1

What I got from War in the Far East volume 1, by Harmsen is that, in mid 1939, Japan was not only wanting to insulate itself from USSR risks, it was hoping for an expanded German-USSR-Japan axis to allow a unified stance against the powers Japan was either at war with or potentially hostile to: China, USA, UK In other words, it didn't them 2 years to draw a ...


30

As Pieter commented, the 11th Army and much of its heavy artillery moved to Leningrad, but much of its infantry did not. Armies and army corps are administrative units to coordinate hundreds of thousands of men, their vehicles, material, etc... Divisions and other subordinate units are swapped in and out as needed. Even armies are cannibalized, shortly after ...


1

That's wishful thinking and ignoring history. The UK's position through the ages always has been to prevent a single European superpower. That's one of the reasons why they fought against France for ages. Later they allied with France when Germany got too big for comfort. A kaiser, Führer or Bundeskanzler(in) makes no difference. A settled peace — even in ...


3

It would be better to add more details, mainly what you understand as 'US HQ in Munich'. The source below gives some details about the establishment of the Office of Military Government for Bavaria (OMGBY), which took place between the 14th of May and the 14th of June 1945. It doesn't give any exact details as to where in Munich they were stationed, but ...


1

Douglas MacArthur is one of the most notorious Military leaders in modern warfare possibly only seconded by Patton himself. He said this in a speech in 1951 during the height of the Red Scare. But once war is forced upon us, there is no other alternative than to apply every available means to bring it to a swift end. War's very object is victory, not ...


2

It means that it's difficult to imagine that armies that just defend, without attacking, will win any war. Of course Patton was speaking from the context of having a large materiel superiority, and having numerical manpower advantages. But, stepping back, the quote was meant to instill the spirit of aggression in his armies and perhaps also the home front.


2

"I didn't think it made much sense, since diplomacy exists" - But, GIVEN war, defeat or stalemate are not as good as winning. "...and no country is unbeatable" - Obviously, but I don't know how this could support your confusion over the quote.


4

Japan wasn't relinquishing its empire From various sources available today we could conclude that there was no general plan for "retreat" into home islands, and defense of it. Some units were withdrawn, but overall it was expected from Japanese armies abroad to fight where they were, and local defensive plans to that end were drawn. Let's go ...


2

Occam's Razor (i.e. the simplest explanation wins) applies to the Holocaust as a whole: What's in it for all the parties who pleaded guilty, from individual Nazis to the Germany as a country? Why would they accept blame for something which hadn't happened? How are the myriad of stories about individual losses of family members kept consistent? If it was ...


0

Half a decade late, and arguably more than a dollar short, but here it goes: How to rebut Holocaust denial argument ? Start by mentioning, rather casually and innocently, the relatively recent case of Oskar Groening, and politely request a plausible explanation for it; if this (not so) small and insignificant example does not significantly deter them, ...


8

There were two key effects of the strategic bombing campaign for the composition and deployment of the Luftwaffe. The first was the shift in production to emphasise fighters for defence, with a resultant decrease in bomber production (in March 1943 962 fighters and 757 bombers were produced; in December 1944 it was 2,630 fighters and 262 bombers), and thus ...


3

RAF Operations Record Books (ORBs) are available at The National Archives; 130 Squadron's ORB for November 1944 is: https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D8387862 (a free download for registered users at the time of writing). Usually there would be both a Form 540 (general summary of events) and a Form 541 (detailed records of events), but it ...


0

I believe a lot of truth in the comments BUT there is a scarcity of hard data. The secondary histories and even the autobiographies which came out in the 50-70's did not address the data but generalities and misinformation created a fog that is only being cut through in the past 20 years due to greater access of information for a lot of reasons. One issue ...


1

On the Pacific theater, there was a plan to invade Japan (Operation Downfall), and it is very helpful to have land bases for your B-24s, P-51, etc. So bypassing Iwo Jima or Okinawa is not really helpful, since you need a large island for the troops and airfields, and there aren't that many options. Also a month is not enough time. Rabaul was bypassed in ...


9

Considering the circumstances, definitely yes Before we start, we must understand and define what kamikaze were. In its essence, kamikaze were form of anti-ship aerial attack. Of course, they were not only form of such attacks. In WW2 Japan had technology to perform conventional bomb or torpedo strikes using aircraft based both on land and sea (carriers and ...


-4

I'll go against the general opinion. Yes, they were extremely effective in the end. The Emperor kept his position, and the war crime trials were done by Japanese tribunals. In spite of USA having the atomic bomb and Russian support. The point was not only to cause losses, it was also to show a willingness to fight to the bitter end. For that goal they were ...


1

Railway guns were outdated by WW2, But it's complicated. They were designed to be artillery, bunker-buster and defensive. Though the German examples during WW2 were the most notable, the British, French, American, Italian... Even Polish and Russian examples had niches. For example, Gladiator (British) was used to train Naval crews on the guns without having ...


80

No. The general argument goes something like this: Japan was running out of trained pilots Japan couldn't spare the fuel to properly train more pilots But they had plenty of planes. Thus untrained kamikaze pilots are more effective than untrained conventional pilots, and they used less fuel. It can be argued that it was the most effective tactic for the ...


18

As a strategy (i.e. something to win the war with)?: No. Japan should have avoided direct war with the US, as a question of national survival. Kamikazes were not going to help in the long run. They were only a symptom of Japan's hopeless "strategy" of inflicting unpalatable losses on the US and forcing the US to accept a draw and ceasefire. As a ...


9

Uncommon, but not Unusual The US Army went through a MASSIVE increase in numbers during WWII. In 1942 there were between 1.5 million and 3 men in the US Army. (1.5 in 1941, I believe 3 million by the end of '42, so your Father joined somewhere in there.) That's already a massive increase over the 189,000-odd strong force of 1939, and the army would be 8.2 ...


6

I would suggest studying Krivosheyev's work for the Soviet losses and Overmans for the German ones. Losses comparison needs to be done with care, as there are many nuances, as such: like counting casualties of the same type (only killed or wounded killed an missing, etc.) on both sides, counting all the allies for Germans, adding up Soviet soldiers who ...


14

Various reasons, from demographics to communist system First we need to start with the period before WW1. Russian Empire was mostly rural and agricultural. According to census from 1897, 77.5% of population were peasants, and this does not include Cossacks who were also rural population but with different status. This corresponds well with the low literacy ...


14

Prior to the adoption of Mountbatten in February 1947, Prince Philip did not use a surname. In the navy during World War II, he was known as HRH Prince Philip. Thus, while serving as First Lieutenant on HMS Wallace (Oct. 1942 to Jan. 1944), he was Lt HRH Prince Philip, RN. He was also referred to as Sub-Lieutenant Prince Philip of Greece in the 12th of ...


11

There was a lot of rapidly changing technology in the B-29's guns during the lifetime of the aircraft, and hence a lot of change in nomenclature for different crew roles. It seems that EMG was used at the end of the war for "Electrical Mechanical Gunner", as seen in crew rosters such as the ones given here in spelled out form, and here in ...


4

Major reason: Lack of experienced leadership Lack of experienced personnel Lack of good equipment. (WW2) A lot of this had to do with the politics in 1930. During the Great Purge, Stalin either incarcerated or executed many people he didn’t feel were “loyal” to him. In November of 1939 when Russia invaded Finnland, Stalin had done away with a lot of his ...


0

I'm a little late to this party, but if anyone is still interested.... I'm sure the source was Moravec himself, but the melodramatic spin would certainly not have been his. As for the errors, they may well have been deliberate. Moravec was acutely aware the Czechoslovak Communists were persecuting members of his family as well as his wartime colleagues and ...


7

There are several reasons Up until late June/July of 1944 Germans still occupied large parts of Soviet territory like Belarus, parts of Ukraine and Baltic republics. Only after Bagration (started on June 22/23) and Lvov–Sandomierz (started in July, ended in August) we could say that main part of USSR was liberated, although some German pockets like Courland ...


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