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4

With the picture material available I would like to challenge the frame of your question. The picture seems to show multiple German soldiers in uniform (although only parts probably because parts were taken off for intensive labor) carrying what looks like it might be a dead body while an armed and properly, but differently uniformed soldier is standing in ...


7

Apart from the Germans using quite a few captured weapons and other pieces of equipment, you've also been watching a Netflix work of fiction. Are you sure the footage is historical that you saw, and not staged as part of filming that series? A LOT of WW2 reenactment uses historically incorrect items, most people never notice. And that includes a lot more ...


4

Germany captured a significant number of enemy weapons (and in some cases fabrication lines) and issued them to second-line troops. As John pointed out in the link in his comment, the Lee-Enfield became the Gewehr 283(e).


1

If you haven't read Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, I would highly recommend him. While not exclusively about WWII his books discuss WWII soviet soldiers both during the war and what they faced after the war. Solzhenitsyn especially focuses on after WWII and those who didn't fit neatly back into Soviet Union. Solzhenitsyn himself was a WWII soldier who followed ...


2

There are some good descriptions, but mainly in Russian fiction and memoirs, for example: Vasili Grossman, Life and fate (there is an English translation), Victor Astafiev, The Cursed and the Slain, Also the memoirs of Lev Kopelev, and short stories of Vasil Bykov. There is also a very high quality, realistic movie: Torpedo bombers (Торпедоносцы) (can be ...


2

Eastern Germany re-organised itself as an affiliate (disputed 1953, 1989) of Soviet foreign policy. Soviet ideology dictated that human social organisations were not inhering in national identity (Stalin "On Linguistics", Soviet policy in central Asia, not with standing, but not significant). This led Soviet ideology to emphasise the historically ...


1

Another possibility, and this is largely opinion, but the question itself invites opinion... Japanese culture is quite different from Western culture in many ways, especially in interpersonal communications. The Japanese tend to speak and even act in a more subtle and nuanced manner than most Western people. A vague parallel might be found in a Western ...


4

By 1939 around 100 permanent airfields had been constructed. Year Military Licensed Civil 1935 60 90 1940 280 0 1945 720 1950 270 90 1955 210 105 1960 130 115 According to the Aeroplane Directory, in 1945 the UK contained 720 operational service airfields (including flying-boat bases), occupying in total ...


5

Preamble Personally (ignore any moderator diamond you might see next to my name - this is just my opinion as a user of History:SE), I think this question should probably have remained closed, since your main question: "Why did Japan never “apologize” enough for World War 2?" appears to be fully answered by the Wikipedia article you cite, and would thus ...


15

Yes, at least one member of the Nazi party is known to have been horrified by the actions of the Japanese Imperial Army. It depends on what you understand by the (plural) term the Nazis I would, in this historical context, understand this as the Government or leadership of Germany or Japan both of which, together with Italy, were allies with ...


2

There was a case where the Japanese government was very upset by an action of the Nazi government. The German surrender that ended WWII in Europe was regarded as a betrayal by the Japanese. Heinrich_Georg_Stahmer was the German ambassador in Japan at the time: On May 5, 1945, as the German surrender was approaching, Stahmer was handed an official protest ...


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