24

They weren't in fact far apart at all. Zoroastrianism was the state religion of the Achaemenid Empire, which encompassed Israel. Its actually even closer than this map implies though. In the period of time that a large amount of the Hebrew scriptures were first being written down, a large part of the Jewish nation was living in exile (slavery) in Babylon. ...


13

Short Answer There is no clear primary source evidence for either why the Hecatomnid dynasty (c. 395 - 334 BC) siblings married each other or why it was 'permitted' (by which I take it to mean why the citizens didn't drum the siblings out of town), but the former question is discussed in some detail by E. D. Carney in Women and Dunasteia in Caria. While ...


5

There seems to be some confusion over what is claimed, what we are looking at, and what we should be looking at. Lets see if we can clear some of it up. Staring with the page the OP cites which claims the palace still stands in Iraq (emphasis mine): the Abbasid Caliph Al-Mutawakkil ordered the tree be felled and transported to his capital in Samarra where ...


4

The Medes Kingdom left a mark on Greek mythology. The Persian Empire, though, should not be equated with Zoroastrianism. It was an eastern religion, not even in Chaldea (Assyria and Babylon) It only took hold in Armenia and the Transcaucasus. If the Zoroastrians did influence Greeks, it probably would have been in the time of Xerxes. The father of ...


3

Some people say that the Tetrateuch (the first four books of the Torah) were written in 8th-7th century Judah. Most people think it was composed entirely during the Babylonian Exile. The exile lasted until the 450s B.C. when Ezra left Babylon. The Jews who were sent to repopulate Judah back in 530 were poor upstarts. Ezra returned during Artaxerxes I, who ...


2

Not only is there no original wood there, but much of the stone there is no longer original. Also, I can see no evidence that there was ever any wood there. If there was, it likely wasn't structural. Here's an old black-and-white aerial photo of the site: And another old color photo: Both of these are from an article on the site from the Archways online ...


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