20

It's referring to kemari, a variation of an ancient Chinese game of kicking a ball-like object around. Originally a military training exercise, it evolved into a sport played by teams of 12 - basically, proto-football - during the Han and Tang dynasties, before spreading to Japan around AD 600 along with the spread of Buddhism. Note that the original source, ...


18

I suspect this is a misleading interpretation of a custom. The rumbling power of the taiko has also been long been associated with the gods, and has been appropriated by the religions of Japan. According to Daihachi Oguchi of Osuwa-daiko, about four thousand years ago, in the Jomon period , taiko was used for to signal various activities in the village. ...


3

In this site, this kamon is named as Hiraoshiki Kenhanakaku. Kenhanakaku means "Sword flower horn". It is a variation of the Hanabishi. Generally I think you will find crests being used by different clans as they adopted symbols and crests from previous/other clans with which they were affiliated or to establish their legitimacy. For example a ...


2

The short answer is mold, tsunami's and earthquakes is why they didn't build with stone. There are few 'ancient' examples of stone building but most of them came from the Chinese style for the temples that were constructed and you can see the resemblance in the Chinese Pagoda vs. the Japanese toba. These Pagoda's were originally constructed as small shrines ...


1

Xu Fu, the most famous explorer in Asia to answer this question, DID have some voyages in the Pacific, but for a strange reason, and some superstitions, too! In 219 BC, Xu Fu was sent with three thousand virgin boys and girls to retrieve the elixir of life from the immortals on the Mount Penglai, including Anqi Sheng, who was purportedly a magician who was ...


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