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Prior to her reign, Queen Elizabeth II served in the Auxiliary Territorial Service of the British Army during World War 2. She held the rank of a junior officer (with a promotion to a Junior Commander a few days before her service ended) National WWII Museum.org. At the time, she was the heir presumptive to the crown. My question is, did she report to any superior officer(s) at the time, and if so, who were they?

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  • @MCW After your edit, the citation to the National WWII Museum website does not have any brackets or other punctuation to distinguish it from the text body. Is this the style here?
    – Sid
    Oct 3 at 17:17
  • When brackets appear, it is most frequently because someone has made a typographical error in the markup language. The citation is in italic, and marked as a URL. There isn't a strict convention/stylebook for citations, but this is closer to the norm than the original. You are welcome to revert, but I suspect I will not be the only one who puzzles over what the markup language was intended to convey....
    – MCW
    Oct 3 at 17:20
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It may not be possible to find out from online material. The London Gazette notes for the calendar years 1942 through 1945 only:

HRH Princess Elizabeth was appointed:

  1. As of Feb. 24, 1942, appointed Col. Gren. Gds;
    enter image description here

  2. As of July 28, 1944, with her mother, appointed regent while her father travelled abroad;
    enter image description here

  3. As of Feb. 24, 1945, granted the honourary rank of 2nd. Sub. in the Auxiliary Territorial Service; and
    enter image description here

  4. As of July 26, 1945, granted the honourary rank J. Cmd. in the Auxiliary Territorial Service
    enter image description here

For the period of interest. the rank structure for the Auxiliary Territorial Service, particularly for officers, was significantly different from that of the regular British Army. In reference to the above:

  • "2nd. Sub" is abbreviation for Second Subaltern, equivalent to regular British Army Second Lieutenant.

  • "J. Cmd" is abbreviation for Junior Commandant, equivalent to regular British Army Captain.

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Notes (from my comment below):

  1. The Gazette - London, Edinburgh, and Belfast editions - are the official record of the United Kingdom. As OP makes no reference to where they have already searched, these are an obvious place to search for more information. I record here the search criteria I used, with the results obtained, to save effort by others. Perhaps others can do better. I was hoping to find a more specific unit designation than "Auxiliary Territorial Service - from which search for a commanding officer and subordinates might have progressed; but no success.

  2. To address the comment below about "regent" (the common English word) vs "Regent" (the title granted under British law to certain persons during a "Regency":
    From the OED (1928):

    Regent
    2. 1. One who s invested with royal authority by, on on behalf of, another; esp one appointed to administer a kingdom during the minority, absence, or incapacity of the sovereign.

    enter image description here

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    @Jos: The Gazette - London, Edinburgh, and Belfast editions - are the official record of the United Kingdom. s OP makes no reference to where they have already searched, these are an obvious place to search for more information. I record here the search criteria I used, with the results obtained, to save effort by others. Perhaps others can do better. I was hoping to find a more specific unit designation than "Auxiliary Territorial Service - from which search for a commanding officer and subordinates might have progressed; but no success. Oct 3 at 16:47
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    @JohnDallman: One might as well remark: "He's no officer; he's a captain." It's titled The Regency Act (1937) because it defines the power, appointment, and other details of various classes of 'regents', one of said classes being 'Counsellors of State" who may perform "such of the royal functions as may be specified in the Letters Patent, and may in like manner revoke or vary any such delegation" [from Article 6 Section 1 of the act linked above]. Oct 3 at 20:50
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    @PieterGeerkens - great answer! Do you know why Princess Elizabeth's ranks were honorary as opposed to substantive? I realise the women's services had a shaky relationship with the regular (male) ones, but other appointments mentioned are not honorary.
    – TheHonRose
    Oct 3 at 21:56
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    @TheHonRose: Without the (assumed and honourary) rank of Second Subaltern every military person with whom the Princess Elizabeth interacted would be required to salute her due to her permanent rank of Colonel Grenadier Guards. That's impractical. Oct 3 at 23:28
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    @PieterGeerkens Oh, of course! That's fascinating, never occurred to me! Thank you so much :-)
    – TheHonRose
    Oct 6 at 17:52

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