49

Although the whole anti-"rootless cosmopolitan" campaign is now widely accepted as being antisemitic in nature, at the time it was framed as being directed against people who "lack patriotism and mindlessly worship the Western culture" - who, incidentally, were Jewish (at least, an overwhelming majority of them were). Thus, the picture depicts a literary ...


30

How often were Jews barred from academic and social clubs in the early 20th century? Feynman's experience was hardly unique: At the turn of the twentieth century, quota requirements limited Jews’ matriculation in college and forced them to compete against one another for the few spots elite colleges had reserved for such students. At that time, Jewish ...


24

Probably because, unlike many other acts in the ancient eastern Mediterranean (perhaps dating back to the antisemitic attitudes expressed by Manetho in the 3rd century BC), the motivation behind the First Jewish War wasn't antisemitic. The actions of Titus First Jewish–Roman War, and those of his father, Vespasian, before him, were aimed at putting down a ...


18

1949 was a bad year to be a communist or nomenklatura. Apart from the Rajk trials of national development line communists in the new soviet-style societies, there was the Leningrad affair and Zhdanovshchina (1946~1957). The most general context was a fear of left social democracy or reformism within Stalinist parties under Soviet hegemony. Yugoslavia was ...


17

I'm not into proscribing a lot of collective guilt onto modern peoples for acts of their cultural ancestors. In fact, its damn silly. However, if someone else is trying to do this publicly, they should be really careful, because when it comes to slavery almost no culture on earth has clean hands. This includes Muslim society, and local Niger-Congo1 cultures. ...


15

I am not sure what you mean by "joined the fray", but it does appear that Rommel did not share Hitler's antisemitism despite being relatively close to him throughout the 1930-ies. Rommel admired Hitler for his success in dismantling the Versailles regime, but ... During Rommel's time in France, Hitler ordered him to deport the country's Jewish ...


15

This is known to have happened sometimes. From the Führer: Hitler no longer appreciated the scale of these exceptional requests. As early as 14 January 1939 he criticised the numerous applications for betterment before the top representatives of the NSDAP. Witness to this "telling off" in the new Reich Chancellery was Günter Kaufmann, then ...


13

I can witness personally that such discrimination existed at Moscow State University. It was kind of an open secret: most people knew about it, but not discussed in public. If you are looking for personal accounts by prominent mathematicians and scientists who were rejected by Moscow State University, that's relatively easy to do just by googling. Here's ...


12

I think this article is a very sinister form of hatred propaganda. It is sinister because it makes a statement which is virtually impossible to debunk. Consider the fact that there are many million Jews around the world. Among these you will find some that are communists, other that are capitalists, and so on. That is no different from other ethnic groups. ...


12

All of Western European culture, world-wide, was anti-Semitic at that time. Germany itself was extremely anti-Semitic, even more so than Europe as a whole. I do not hesitate to state that even that handful of Germans who risked their lives to save Jewish friends, would have to be regarded as anti-Semitic in regard to Jews who were not personally well-known ...


12

There are many examples of antisemitic caricatures in the far-right French press between the two world wars, especially in the thirties. It is not so easy to find them on the net (I don't know where to look), but a good library with a collection of the journal "Je suis partout", one of the most famous of those journals, should give you plenty of examples.


12

Given the totalitarian nature of the SU, information on such a blatant ethnic discrimination was not officially confirmed (duh!) and spreading it, in fact, could land one in jail. This accounts for the lack of "official sources". However, this was common knowledge among Jewish "abiturients" (as the contenders for college admission were called) and their ...


11

As surprising as this may seem, there is some truth in these allegations, but of course this does not change in any way their antisemitic character. Why there is some truth The French Triangular Trade was conducted primarily from the harbor of Nantes, from where departed almost as many slave-carrying ships as from all the other French harbors combined. ...


10

"Of Mongrels and men. The shared ideology of anti-miscegenation law, Chinese exclusion and contemporary American neo-nativism" by Geoffrey Neri, is a 40 page long study of anti-miscegenation laws in the US. The "religious basis" for these laws is listed (pages 8-9) as As authority for these convictions, anti-miscegenation proponents cited the Bible, ...


10

From German wikipedia on Luther's relationship to the Jews and antisemitism, translated/paraphrased by me: The propaganda organ Stürmer claimed Luther as a ruthless antisemite and that protestant pastors should preach this aspect more (note that ruthless antisemite is meant positive here & apparently the actual quote) Julius Streicher (head editor) ...


9

We have the following statements in Burke's writings: They [leaders of previous revolutions] were not like Jew brokers contending with each other who could best remedy with fraudulent circulation and depreciated paper the wretchedness and ruin brought on by their degenerate councils. (Reflections on the Revolution in France) We have in London very ...


8

This cartoon is a part of the campaign in the Soviet media which started on January 28, 1949 with publication in Pravda (central newspaper of the Communist party) which was called "On an anti-party group of theater critics". The slogans of the campaign were "struggle with rootless cosmopositism" and "against cringing before the West". One part of it was "...


7

One cannot look at history with the morality of today. Antisemitism as we know it today did not exist back then.


6

Antisemitism is something that is quite unbelievable for us nowadays You must be living in a cave paradise. Indeed, right after WW2 antisemitism became quite unpopular in Europe, mostly because it was associated with the German aggression, and many peoples and countries suffered from it the atrocious methods of the Nazi genocide appalled "modern ...


5

An important feature of the Soviet enrollment system was that all proposed problems should be taught in the course of the school program. If somebody was asked a question outside of the school course, such exam could be easily appealed. As such, an art of creating problems that were very difficult, yet could be solved with school techniques emerged. The ...


5

Antisemitism, as defined by radically different treatment compared to their Christain counterparts Was the antisemitism based on the specific opinions of thought leaders The greatest doctor of the Catholic Church, St. Thomas Aquinas (✝1274), when discussing the sin of unbelief, asks "Whether the children of Jews and other unbelievers ought to be baptized ...


4

I also suspect that there is significance in the mismatched patterns of our vagabond's jacket and pants; ... And possibly the hat and the overstuffed valise, for that matter. What would a Russian in 1949 have understood these symbols to mean? Details of wardrobe and facial features are not the most important clues here. Look at this photo from 1934: The ...


4

Would a monument commemorating the US victory in the Civil War be considered an example of antisouthernism? Would a monument commemorating the US victory in the Great Sioux War of 1876-1877 be considered an example of antisiouxism? Would a monument commemorating Cortez's victories be considered an example of antiaztecism? Would a monument commemorating V-...


4

We don't know. Reliable information about him is sparse. The claims presented in the question have to be called "wholly unfounded". Important to distinguish anti-judaism and antisemitism. One is directed against the believers of a faith, assaulting this 'fasle belief* and trying to 'better' them by conversion; the other does that too but goes one ...


4

When dealing with the "causes" of events there are no facts. You are in the world of interpretation and opinion. Characterizing the American entry into the war as the sole product of a Rothschild PR campaign is as ridiculous as it is unprovable. Your statement that the revolutions were having no effect on the war seems incorrect to me. To which "sources" ...


3

Since there is no reason for AntiSemitism in France to have died out because of the treaty of Versailles only to spring right back at the outbreak of WWII, the reasonable conclusion is that there were AntiSemitic cartoons as usual during the period, to reflect the known levels of AntiSemitism in France at the time. Not to single out France, as there was an ...


2

Jews were prohibited from living in Jerusalem by the Emperor Hadrian around 136 as a response to the Bar Kochba revolt. (In fact, there was even a perimeter...i.e. not allowed to live within something like 20 miles of Jerusalem.) This was reversed by the emperor Julian in the early 360s. So it seems unlikely that Sylvester could have been the cause of a ...


2

Friedländer is talking about a specifically Nazi aspect of anti-Semitism. That's the belief in a racial hierarchy, with the "Nordic race" at the top, and "the Jews" at the bottom. It holds that everything wrong with the world, and everything wrong with people, is a result of the malign influence of "the Jews." It never goes into details about how this ...


1

The rise really started in 19th century. The main reason was the general rise of nationalism related to creation of nation-states in Europe. Shortly before that, or simultaneously, the Jews were emancipated in most European countries. They left the ghettos, where they lived in relative isolation and started to mix with general population. With growing ...


1

Nietzsche went insane when he was about 40. His sister took possession of his affairs. She complied his unpublished writings and edited them. She, a big fan of Hitler, published some of her brother's unreleased works and edited a bit to fit the Nazi point of view better.


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