25

It is Tannu Tuva. When Mongolia broke out from China in 1911, this little territory was separated from China (which was in a state of internal turmoil during the first years of the Republic of China) but was not claimed by Mongolia. In practice, Tannu Tuva was a Soviet satellite country, only the Soviet Union and Mongolia recognized it. Stalin annexed it ...


12

As I touched in the last paragraph of this answer, we don't really know who the Huns were. Its one of the great mysteries of history, up there with the identity of the Sea Peoples. It appears the initial idea that they were the same people as the Xiongnu in the Chinese records came from an 18th Century French historian who also argued that China was ...


7

Expanding on Alex's answer, that beige strip is the Khanate of Khiva and the Emirate of Bukhara, both of which had been reduced to the status of protectorates of the Russian Empire half a century before. They were conquered, disolved an incorporated to the Soviet Union by the Bolsheviks in 1920-1924. Depending of the exact date of your map, how accurate is ...


7

You make the wrong conclusion from what the paper says: The next step in alphabet reform came at the 1926 Baku (Azerbaijan) Turkological Congress, which proposed the adoption of the Latin script for all Turkic languages in the USSR. By 1930, the Arabic script had been replaced by the Birlashdirilmish yangi Turk alifbesi (New Unified Turkic alphabet). By ...


6

Kazakhstan used a Latin alphabet until the Soviets forced them to use Cyrillic, the same was probably true in other central Asian countries. So it is quite likely to be true, yes. Source: I used to live in Kazakhstan.


5

This is the Emirate of Bukhara conquered by Soviet Union n 1920. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emirate_of_Bukhara#/media/File:XXth_Century_Citizen%27s_Atlas_map_of_Central_Asia.png So if this map is of 1923, it is somewhat out of date. Though the resistance continued after 1920.


5

That varied. Over time and space – and sadly for description – not ever uniformly. Trying such a broad stroke nevertheless: Until the 1940s it went up and down at the same time and this differed between locations, social strata. While extremely poor and remote populations started to wear it, in urban contexts its use went down. But even in rural areas it ...


3

The question, as is, covers a long period between Alexander (d. 323 BCE) and Mahmud of Ghazni (b. 975 CE) and the ethnic and religious influence changed extensively over the period of more than a 1000 years. So, I will focus on Gandhara during the early stages, immediately post-Alexander, and with particular emphasis on Buddhism (Gandhara was in the ...


3

Hunnic cauldrons were the same style as the Xiongnu of the 1st century AD. People think that the Huns brought them from Mongolia, to Central Asia and Europe, where they are found. Westward migrations, driven by nomadic warfare or Chinese offensives, were the prevailing trend in Pre-Genghissid Steppe History. There were almost never west-east migrations. ...


3

The Mongols, the Turks, and the Turkic peoples living in Asia between them, all seem to have similar "folk wrestling" styles that tend to center on takedowns (rather than pinning or throwing out of a certain area). Based on that, it seems fair to say that there was likely a common Altaic wrestling style ancestral to all of them. Regardless of that though, ...


2

The Jahangiris (1190-1520), a Tajik dynasty, were the original Sultans of Swat.* They ruled in parts of modern Afghanistan and Pakistan. From The Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab: A dynasty of Sultans who, according to Raverty, once ruled from Nangrahar to the Jhelum but, by the time the Kheshi Pathans overran Swat, their sway did not ...


2

I've done some research via available pages of relevant books on the internet. It seems that in the following years of 'attack' campaign wearing veil at the schools was strictly forbidden as a dress code in the Uzbek Soviet SR as well as other Muslim populated regions in the country. However excerpts from the books indicate presence of veiled students in ...


1

This is a map of the region from 1923:


1

I found it in my notes. It's called Wu-Shan-Mu. Curiously, "Wu Shan Mu Xiongnu" brought up no results on google. "Wu-shan-mu had close ties with the Hsiung-nu. Hu-lu-ku, ruler of the Hsiungnu (96–85 b.c.), arranged a marriage with the family of the ruler of the Wu-shan-mu, establishing blood ties between the two states. In 60 b.c. Ch’i-hou-shan, son of the ...


1

I can give you one more name for your list. The king defeated by the Turco-Sassanian alliance was Khushnavaz. Probably. The Timeline seems disputed however. Reading details on the Sassinid leader at the time, Khosrow I led to this passage: According to the medieval Arab historian al-Masudi, Khosrow had before this event campaigned deeply in Hephthalite ...


1

The language of the Turkic literary works emanating from the Qara Xan empire (namely al-Kashgari and the Kutadgu Bilig) are not written in Uyghur (alias Old Turkish), but in a different branch of Turkic. Clauson, in his “Etymological Dictionary Of Pre-Thirteenth-Century Turkish” classifies it as Xaqani, not Uyghur. This means that it is problematic to ...


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