51

Based on this page from the French School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences, it appears that the neighbouring Balsesmes merged into La Haye-Descartes in 1966, before the combined commune was renamed to Descartes the next year. In 1962, the two communes had remarkably similar population levels of 1,679 and 1,689. With a combined population of 4,267 ...


37

There were two major, interrelated events that caused this population boom in the 1970s. The first was the discovery of oil on Alaska's North Slope at Prudhoe Bay and elsewhere in 1968 and 1969. The second was the raising of oil prices by OPEC in 1973 and 1979. Both sets of developments resulted in the rapid growth of oil production in Alaska, and its ...


35

Data published by the demographer Carl Haub and Dr. Toshiko Kaneda in How Many People Have Ever Lived on Earth? on the Population Reference Bureau (PRB) website suggests that the 50 billionth person would have been born around 130 AD / CE. This can be seen by looking at the column 'Number Ever Born' in the table below: Image source: Population Reference ...


28

According to this article the ratio rose from 1.10 to about 1.54 (ratio of men/women fell from 0.91 to about 0.65) between 1941 and 1946 in the draft-age group (people born around 1887 to 1927), which was the most affected by the war losses. Other age groups were less affected, so I'd say that the overall ratio would be around 1.3-1.25 (0.75-0.8 men/women)....


27

University of Alaska, Anchorage published a study into People and Economy of Alaska, which can be viewed here. From that source, I'd say there are following reasons for their population boom: Discovery of Oil As Tom has already mentioned, Oil was discovered in 1968 in Prudhoe Bay oilfields. Alaska collected $55 billion in oil revenues through 2001, with ...


16

The Soviet population in 1941 was 196,716,000. In 1946, it was 170,548,000.[1] That's a difference of 26,168,000 people. According to a study published by the Russian Academy of Science[2], there were 12,300,000 births and 11,900,000 natural deaths during war, so the populational decrease must be entirely attributed to war deaths. Considering 400,000 births ...


14

Because people are quibbling in comments over the meaning of "overpopulation", it might suggest that this question is broad or unclear. So let's look at it from a different angle. In the 1960's, Dr. John Calhoun, working at NIH, conducted his famous (some would say infamous) "mouse utopia experiment". Mice were placed in an enclosure (named "Universe 25") ...


13

Maybe not Joseph Tainter argues, in Archeology of Overshoot and Collapse, that so far there is no evidence of a Malthusian catastrophe. Whether you follow Tainter in this assertion will in part depend on how wide or narrow your definition of overpopulation is. Problem with definition According to Malthus, population grows exponentially while food ...


13

Most empires (Achaemenid, Roman, Eastern Roman, Osman, Austro-Hungarian and Russian) had very diverse populations and were quite sustainable. Even if you count Eastern Roman empire separately from the Western one, the Western one existed for more than 400 years, and the Eastern one for 1000 years after that. Actually many European countries have very ...


12

As noted in the discussion on the question, there are two kinds of overpopulation which I'll call "chronic" and "acute". Chronic overpopulation, where the full production capacity of agriculture in normal times is insufficient to feed the population, is sometimes the only case people consider. But acute overpopulation, where the population "only" starves in ...


11

Russian urbanization in the Soviet and post-Soviet eras (2012), p. 22, states: However, the GPW rapidically reshaped the population dynamics of the region. Even as late as 1959, the populations of St Petersburg and nearby cities remained far below their pre-war levels, and the Moscow conurbation had shrunk back towards its centre. In constrast, ...


11

Using the delta areas as proxies for the entire river valley systems: The area of the Ganges delta (about 59,000 km2) is nearly 4 times as large as Mesopotamia (about 15,000 km2), and 3 times as large as the Nile river delta (about 19,000 km2). Additionally: Once wet-rice cultivation with paddies is developed, rice provides nearly twice the calories per ...


9

While Peter Turchin has overstated the case, it is most likely that this was usually true. Infant mortality rates were very high until they started to decline in the early decades of the 20th century (especially in Europe and the US). To this can be added the generally high death rate from lack of effective medical care and frequent epidemics. These factors ...


9

I have seen similar patterns in other parishes where I've been researching my own ancestors. A number of factors were at play, and it is difficult to be specific for a particular parish, however, the most likely reasons for Eversholt appear to be: There was a huge migration of population from rural areas to urban areas over that period. A series of ...


9

There are no really reliable estimates for the population of Mycenaean Greece, although scholars have supplied some (more or less educated) guesses. On the more conservative end of the scale, Stanford's Mitsotakis professor Josiah Ober has written that: The population of Hellas in the Mycenaen period (including Thessaly and Crete) was somewhere in the ...


8

The exact population is a bit unclear. Estimates for the time period fall in between 2 and 4 million. This area of Egypt was one of the more densely populated areas in the world at that time due to the fertility of the Nile delta. In the Biblical account, Exodus 12:30 says "for there was not a house without someone dead". Family size is also tough to nail ...


8

Population estimates A number of estimates have been made for the population of ancient Egypt but, as the article The people of ancient Egypt says, Egyptologists tend to dodge the issue of population numbers, as there are no statistics available and all such numbers are based on more or less educated guesswork. The British Museum Dictionary of ...


8

The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 seems to reflect the kind of data you are looking for. The deaths would not be strongly gender related, and the time frame coincides generally with the time frame of your theoretical query. The deaths in England specifically are discussed at Historic UK: During the pandemic of 1918/19, over 50 million people died ...


8

Easter Island is one example. From the Wikipedia article: It is believed that Easter Island's Polynesian inhabitants arrived on Easter Island sometime between 700 and 1100 CE. They created a thriving and industrious culture as evidenced by the island's numerous enormous stone moai and other artifacts. However, human activity, the introduction of ...


8

According to Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, at the beginning of the Christian era it was about 2 million, and in the next 2 pairs of centuries it geometrically rose to about 2 2/3 million, then nearly 4. It had climbed to a high of about five and a quarter million around the time of Muhammad, a high-water mark that was receded from a bit to about 4.5 ...


8

Switzerland consists of German-speaking and French-speaking populations, plus some smaller groups. Pretty stable for 500 years.


7

China is not so populous. By population density it is on 84-th place, after Italy (65), Nigeria (64), Germany (58), Pakistan (56), United Kingdom (51), Japan (40), India (33), Netherlands (31), Bangladesh (10), not mentioning small countries. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_territories_by_population_density So the correct question ...


7

Long history of strong agricultural production Long periods of stability and prosperity Large land area Culture that encourages more than 2 children Long history of a large state encompassing a large land area. Really though, China isn't that special. Just for sake of comparison: South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka) ~ 1.7 Billion China (...


7

Primarily, in Eastern England and Western Scotland. In particular, what you might be looking for is the Danelaw. Technically, it refers to the parts of England (roughly one-third) where Scandinavian (Danish) laws applied. In geographic terms, this is a huge swathe of Northern and Eastern England conquered by invading Vikings during the 9th century. England ...


7

You're probably correct, it seems to be this year. To start with, our inquiry can most likely be safely restricted to the last few decades. As this graph from Wikipedia establishes, in absolute terms, total deaths from recent years outstrips even the Second World War. The First World War, even with the influenza, was considerably less deadly than the Second....


7

The general pattern of rapid population growth seen in early modern Europe around the 1800s (and to a more limited extent in the 1700s) is known as "stage two" of the demographic transition. Quoting from Wikipedia: This stage leads to a fall in death rates and an increase in population.The changes leading to this stage in Europe were initiated in the ...


6

Sparta always was a closed society, and the exact numbers of citizens (i.e. warriors) were an absolutely secret information all the time, no doubt. After all, what do we know for sure? In the Battle of Platea there were 5000 spartiates, 5000 perioikoi, and 35000 helots. Also let's add that Plutarch in "Lycurgus" mentions 39000 shares in Laconia: 9000 ...


5

India's first (& most reliable) census was from 1867 to 1871, known as 1872 Census of India. Government of India confirms this in their census history So, there is no data prior to this census, hence all numbers below are estimates. In terms of estimated population, circa 1800 to 1850, The Cambridge Economic History of India, Volume 2, c.1751–c.1970 ...


5

Census information from 1950 can be read in Census of Population: 1950: Number of inhabitants, By United States. Bureau of the Census Table 24, pages 1-48 thru 1-64 contains the populations of each city in each state, alphabetical by state. Whatever you need is in there. On a guess at what you don't have, here's some excerpts: - ALASKA ...


5

You can read PDFs of all US censuses since 1790 on the US Census website. If the PDF's are a problem, Wikipedia keeps pages for all of them too, with nice modern HTML graphs rather than scans. Here's the one for 1790. The grand total was a bit under 4 Million.


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