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One way to convert ancient currencies is to find out how much of a given item it can purchase (steel for example) vs. what it can buy in a per mass equivalent today. Steel 1000 years ago was a handmade, very expensive material to acquire. Today thanks to furnaces, steel is $0.03 a pound. from a material standpoint, Given that a sestertius was valued as 2.5 ...


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Not as such. But there were stronger and weaker cohorts. When a Roman legion of this period deployed for battle, the default formation was to arrange the cohorts in two rows from right to left. That is, the first and sixth cohorts would be on the right flank, while the fifth and tenth on the left. See the following illustration from Vox: As you deduced, one ...


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