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16

The uniform here is a musicians uniform, civil war era. A picture at the Library of Congress shows an individual wearing a similar uniform. The image has the label (emphasis mine) [Private George V. Capron, bugler, of Co. G, 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery Regiment in uniform] Another LOC image shows another musician, this one with sword. Caption ...


6

IMHO, that it is an imitation of the cavalry uniform. Reasons: The light stripes on the breast are drawn, not made of the lacing, as it was normal even for privates for all 19-20 cent. Such stripes were used in cavalry only. The sabre, even the straight one, also points to the cavalry. So poor uniform could belong only to a private. But they could not adorn ...


4

A full copy of the current British Army dress regulations can be found here. It's a 1,279 page PDF. Obviously, it is not obeyed scrupulously all the time, and there is a history of senior commanders dressing somewhat informally. A prime example is Lieutenant-General Thomas Picton, who commanded his division at Waterloo in civilian clothes, because his ...


4

In the US Civil war there was 4th Ohio Volunteers, a 3 month regiment raised in 1861, and another 4th Ohio Volunteers, a 3 year regiment that served in 1861-65. There was another 4th Ohio volunteers, also known as the 14 Ohio National Guard, During the Spanish-American War in 1898. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_Ohio_Infantry1 Thus you photo should ...


-1

Question: Is this Civil War era uniform? Short Answer: No that particular sack coat, I do not believe is a civil war era coat. Probable the Spanish American War. "K 4th o v" refers to killed, and 4th Ohio Infantry(volunteers) who saw action in both the civil war and spanish American war. To me the buttons appear to be wrong for this to be a ...


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